Ginseng Season in Georgia & Tennessee

Friday, August 9, 2002

The 2002 ginseng harvest season in Georgia is set to open August 15 and will run through December 31. Ginseng is a perennial herb native to much of eastern North America including Georgia. Ginseng roots are purported to have numerous medicinal properties and can be converted to a variety of forms such as pills, powders, extracts, and teas.

In Georgia, ginseng is not presently endangered or threatened but is rare. It is most abundant in the Southern Blue Ridge area or north Georgia mountain counties. Only plants with three or more prongs can be legally harvested, and diggers are required to replant ripe berries at the same location. Last season over 700 pounds of wild ginseng was harvested and sold in Georgia.

"Increasing demand for ginseng products has caused concern that wild ginseng populations might become depleted," said Jon Ambrose, Georgia Natural Heritage Program Manager. "Continuation of our wild ginseng harvest and export program depends upon the cooperation of our growers, dealers, and diggers. This includes accurate record keeping and good conservation practices to maintain compliance with federal and state laws."

The Ginseng Protection Act requires that all diggers must obtain written permission from the landowner prior to harvesting ginseng root, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resource Division. Ginseng growers and dealers must be registered with the Ginseng Management Program of the Wildlife Resource Division. Dealers and growers must maintain precise records of purchases and sales. County of origin, weight, and condition of purchased ginseng must be recorded
ight certified by a Wildlife Resources Division biologist before export. In addition, all harvested ginseng on hand and unsold by March 31, 2003, must be weighed and reported to the G
inseng Management Program. Ginseng Shipment Certificates and End-of-Season Weight Receipts are available from a certifying biologist.

Permits issued by the U. S. Forest Service are required for ginseng harvest on the Chattahoochee National Forest. Because ginseng is rare, some Forest Service districts do not allow harvesting. Diggers should check with the appropriate Forest Service district office to determine if ginseng digging is allowed and to obtain permits. No ginseng harvest is allowed on lands owned by the State of Georgia.

To register as a ginseng grower or dealer or for more information, contact the Georgia Natural Heritage Program, Ginseng Management, Wildlife Resources Division, 2117 US Hwy 278, SE, Social Circle, GA 30025, (770) 918-6411.

More Info about Ginseng In Tennessee


Alexander: Tennessee Receives $10 Million For Foothills Parkway To Improve Access To The Smokies

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) said that a $10 million federal transportation grant he supported will help complete a 16-mile section of the Foothills Parkway in Blount and Sevier counties, improving access to the federally owned and operated Great Smoky Mountains National Park and “enhancing tourism and economic development” in East Tennessee. “I grew up hiking, ... (click for more)

5th Permit For 2016 Elk Hunt To Be Auctioned On Ebay, July 28-Aug. 7

The fifth permit for participation in Tennessee’s eighth managed elk hunt will be awarded to the successful bidder in an eBay auction to be held from July 28-Aug 7. Proceeds from the auction benefit the state’s elk restoration program. Since the elk hunt was implemented in 2009, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) has donated a permit to a Non-Governmental Organization ... (click for more)

Beck Upset By Criticism Of Late WWTA Director Cleveland Grimes In WWTA Analysis; Boyd Won't Rewrite 57-Page Report

County Commissioner Greg Beck said it was inappropriate for fellow Commissioner Tim Boyd to include articles critical of the late Cleveland Grimes in a 57-page report on the Hamilton County Water and Wastewater Treatment Authority. He said, "Criticizing a dead man - I don't know if that's appropriate. If that's Christianity, let me off the wagon." Saying the report should ... (click for more)

Investor In Scheme Says Dyer Made Contacts At Quarterback Club

One of the investors who was a loser in an investment scheme recently halted by the Securities and Exchange Commission said one of the Chattanooga brokers involved made many of his contacts through the Chattanooga Quarterback Club. Paul Smith, former Hamilton County Democratic Party chairman, said Doug Dyer has been the president for many years of the club that promotes UTC and ... (click for more)

Give Bullet-Proof Vests To Every Black Youth In The City - And Response (2)

I heard a report that the Chattanooga police were being given better bullet-proof vests, and I had an idea. What if Chattanooga became known for something besides electric buses and fast internet service? What if Chattanooga provided a bullet-proof vest to every young black man and black youth in the city limits?   I can hear the scoffing as I write, but think about it. ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Our Horses Vs. DesJarlais

It is well-known that shortly after the despicable “Big Lick” faction of the Tennessee Walking Horse industry put on a very-pointed fundraiser for the equally repugnant Congressman Scott DesJarlais (R-Jasper) two years ago, the misguided doctor has repeatedly tried to bully and strong-arm the U.S. Department of Agriculture on the behalf of the vermin who sadistically torture the ... (click for more)