Lee University Will Dedicate New Buildings Friday

Tuesday, September 21, 2004
The new Center for Humanities building at Lee University. Click to enlarge.
The new Center for Humanities building at Lee University. Click to enlarge.

Lee University will celebrate two years of improvement and success in a day of campus-wide festivities on Friday, Sept. 24. The event, “Celebration 2004” will feature the dedication and ribbon-cutting of the new Center for the Humanities.

A convocation and dedication service will begin at 10:30 a.m. in the Conn Center. The formal service will dedicate the Center for the Humanities with an academic processional, a 300-student Festival choir and orchestra and an address by President Paul Conn. A ribbon-cutting ceremony will immediately follow at the building.

Friday’s festivities will begin at 9 a.m. with an offering of 40 different seminars covering a wide variety of topics taught by special guest speakers which are open to the public and will last about an hour each.

The Center for Humanities is the newest and largest academic building on Lee’s campus and will provide space for psychology, sociology, history, political science, anthropology, human development and counseling classes and offices. The building features 13 classrooms, two computer centers for teaching and student use, two lounges for students and faculty, a 200 seat recital hall, a 125 seat lecture hall, 10 music faculty studios, 10 music practice rooms, 26 faculty offices, departmental offices and workrooms, a music archive and small ensemble rehearsal room, two walk-out balconies, and 51,000 feet of academic space. The building opened in August for use.

The building has been funded by many friends of Lee including Richard and Helen DeVos, long-time supporters of Lee and well known philanthropists nationwide. William and JoAnn Squires contributed the building’s recital hall in further support of Lee University. The Squires’ live in Charlotte and have been involved with Lee since the 1960s.

The lecture hall will honor the late George R. Johnson, a renowned business man of Bradley County and whose charitable trust provides for the general welfare, health and education of East Tennessee and North Georgia. Don and Carolyn Medlin funded the clock tower and plaza. The tower rises 95 feet above the plaza below and houses a three-faced clock. Mr. Medlin has served on Lee’s Board of Directors for the last 22 years and has been a long-time supporter of the university’s success.

The McKenzie Athletic Building, donated by Tobe McKenzie and his wife Rebecca, was dedicated in 2003 and has been described as “the nerve center of the Lee University athletic program.” The building provides a spacious fitness facility, a clinical facility and offices for Lee’s collegiate coaches. Cliff Schimmels Park, named for the late Dr. Schimmels, beloved writer and teacher at Lee, was completed in 2003 and features a half-mile walking trail, park benches and tables and a picnic shelter.

In addition to the Humanities building, two residence halls, an athletic building and a park will be recognized. O’Bannon-Bowdle Hall, named for two of Lee’s most outstanding professors, Dr. Robert O’Bannon and Dr. Donald Bowdle, opened in 2002 is Lee’s newest “super-dorm” for men. Brinsfield Row, named for the late J. Stewart Brinsfield who served as President of Lee University from 1948-1951, is Lee’s latest addition to women’s housing and is a set of two dozen townhouses along Magnolia Street.

Open Houses of each of these facilities will be held on Friday, Sept. 24, from 12-1 p.m. with faculty and student hosts at each location to display the buildings.

Celebration ceremonies will be attended by dozens of dignitaries, financial supporters from several states, and representatives from the last 50 graduating classes, all marching in caps and gowns. The University’s Board of Directors, and local civic and business leaders and elected officials will also be present this week.

One of the lecture halls in the Center for Humanities building.
One of the lecture halls in the Center for Humanities building.

New Class Of Young Leaders Begins 8-Month Program In Cleveland

The Youth Leadership class of 2014-15 began a new year of developing their leadership skills by attending a daylong leadership retreat recently. The students are taking part in the 13 th year of this important workforce development program of the Cleveland/Bradley Chamber of Commerce. The class consists of 26 high school juniors and seniors selected a few months ago through ... (click for more)

National Panhellenic Conference Recognizes Chattanooga Alumnae Panhellenic Association

National Panhellenic Conference, an advocacy organization for women and the sorority experience, Tuesday announced that it has recognized 59 Alumnae Panhellenics across 27 states for their outstanding service to the sorority community.  The Chattanooga Alumnae Panhellenic Association was recognized for Citation of Merit. Representatives of alumnae from NPC member sororities, ... (click for more)

City, County Pull The Plug On Downtown Shooting Range

City and county officials have decided to keep the police firing range at Moccasin Bend rather than building an expensive new indoor facility at the former Farmers Market property. County Mayor Jim Coppinger said Sheriff Jim Hammond and new Police Chief Fred Fletcher met recently and decided to "pull the plug" on the project. He said officers felt that the Moccasin Bend range ... (click for more)

Reception Honors County's 2nd-Longest Serving Employee

General Sessions Court Judge Clarence Shattuck, at a County Courthouse reception, asked anyone who was working at the courthouse in 1966 to raise their hand. Only Circuit Court Clerk Paula Thompson was able to do so. Judge Shattuck said he believes only Edna Camp of the Criminal Court clerk's office, has been at the courthouse longer. Ms. Thompson did not seek re-election, ... (click for more)

Noise Fallout Coming Soon On Chattanooga's Flawed Sound Control Ordinance - And Response (3)

I have been practicing acoustical, audio and sound engineering for more than twenty years. Since I understand many aspects of sound, I sent the enclosed letter to the Chattanooga City Council members regarding some of my concerns on the impending noise ordinance changes. My comments were unacknowledged.     August 19, 2014 Dear Chattanooga ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Al Sharpton’s Wise Remarks

I’ll admit I paid little more than scant attention to the Monday funeral of Michael Brown, the 18-year-old who was shot and killed by police bullets in Ferguson, Mo., after he allegedly was involved in strong-armed robbery. There are too many tawdry details and, in my way of thinking, there is nothing under God’s sun, absolutely nothing, that gives others the right to riot, burn ... (click for more)