Goodwill HELPs Founders Honored with International Award

Wednesday, July 5, 2006
Left to right are HELPs co-founder Susie Thompson, Chattanooga Goodwill Industries President and CEO Dennis Brice, HELPs co-founder Gigi Logan, and HELPs manager Kimberly Myers. Click to enlarge.
Left to right are HELPs co-founder Susie Thompson, Chattanooga Goodwill Industries President and CEO Dennis Brice, HELPs co-founder Gigi Logan, and HELPs manager Kimberly Myers. Click to enlarge.

When physical therapists Gigi Logan and Susie Thompson approached Chattanooga Goodwill Industries about a community medical equipment program six years ago, they said they never dreamed they would one day win an international award for their efforts.

Mrs. Thompson and Mrs. Logan were recently selected to receive the 2006 Robert E. and Charlotte Watkins Award for Mission Advancement from Goodwill Industries International for Goodwill HELPs, the program that the two women instituted at Chattanooga Goodwill Industries in May 2000 and that they have continued to serve as volunteers ever since.

The award was presented to them last week at the 2006 Goodwill Delegate Assembly in St. Louis, Mo., along with a $1,000 check.

Dennis Brice, President and CEO of Chattanooga Goodwill Industries, received the good news in a letter from George Kessinger, President and CEO of Goodwill Industries International.

“The judging panel felt confident that Gigi Logan and Susie Thompson were exemplary winners,” wrote Mr. Kessinger. “Their example further enriches (the Goodwill) movement and their community.”

Under the management of Kimberly Myers, Director of Community Services, Goodwill HELPs (Health Equipment Link Program) provides free durable medical equipment to people in 23 counties throughout Southeast Tennessee and Northwest Georgia who can’t afford to buy it for themselves.

“Health equipment can be an expensive or impossible purchase for a growing number of people,” said Mrs. Thompson. “Goodwill HELPs goes a long way toward improving the quality of life for people in our community every day.”

Kenneth Lee, a HELPs client who received a free wheelchair from Goodwill last year, agrees. “If I didn’t have the wheelchair from Goodwill, I’d just be stuck in the bed all day, depending on other folks, and that’s not me,” he said. “I want to work and support myself, and this chair is a big help. I thank God that Goodwill was there for me. Otherwise, there’s no telling what I would’ve been doing.”

The majority of equipment supplied by Goodwill is donated to HELPs by individuals who no longer need it. Goodwill employees and clients clean and repair the equipment before passing it along to people in need. Other equipment and supplies are donated directly to Goodwill by manufacturing companies, medical equipment suppliers and healthcare providers.

While some items, like motorized wheelchairs, are in such high demand that waiting lists are several years long, many items such as crutches and walkers are kept in stock so that requests can be fulfilled in a matter of days.

Since the program’s inception, more than 5,000 people have received free equipment from Chattanooga Goodwill Industries.
“Our goal is to grow the program to 10,000 clients served each year by 2010,” said Bruce Carscaddon, Vice President of Mission Services. “With the community’s continued support, I know we can do that.”

For more information about Goodwill HELPs, to donate equipment to the program or to request free equipment for yourself or a family member, visit goodwillchatt.org or call (423)629-2501, ext. 314.

Goodwill Industries International is a network of 207 community-based organizations that serves people with workplace disadvantages and disabilities by providing job training and employment services, as well as job placement opportunities and post-employment support.

To fund the mission, Goodwill collects donated clothing and household goods to sell in its retail stores and on shopgoodwill.com and provides contract labor services to business and government.

Chattanooga Goodwill Industries serves clients in 23 counties in Southeast Tennessee and Northwest Georgia.



State Supreme Court Clarifies Law When Bank Sells Loan Collateral Without Proper Notice

The Supreme Court of Tennessee issued guidance on the steps courts should follow when a creditor sells collateral used to obtain a loan, but does not provide the required notice of the sale. The case involved a bank loan that was used to purchase an airplane, with the plane itself and additional guarantors securing the transaction. When the debtor failed to maintain insurance, the ... (click for more)

Chattanooga Lawyer James Purple Censured

James Dimmett Purple, an attorney licensed to practice law in Tennessee, received a Public Censure on Thursday, from the Board of Professional Responsibility of the Tennessee Supreme Court. Mr. Purple failed to diligently represent or adequately communicate with a client who had retained him in a quiet title action. Mr. Purple filed the quiet title action without naming essential ... (click for more)

City Has Apparently Found Buyer For Chattanoogan Hotel

The city of Chattanooga has apparently found a buyer for the Chattanoogan hotel on Broad Street. A city board will meet next Monday to consider several resolutions. One item before the Chattanooga Downtown Redevelopment Corporation is approving the hiring of the Husch Blackwell law firm "as special counsel in connection with the preparation of a sale and purchase agreement ... (click for more)

Logan Kennedy, 18, And Katelyn Woods, 19, Killed In Birchwood House Fire On Sunday

Logan Kennedy, 18, of Birchwood, and Katelyn Woods, 19, from Bradley County, were killed in a house fire in Birchwood on Sunday. Highway 58 volunteer firefighters responded around 6 p.m. to a residential house fire near the 12,100 block of Dolly Pond Road with possible entrapment. According to fire personnel, upon arrival the house was fully involved.   After the ... (click for more)

Congress Needs To Get Down To Business And The News Media Report Facts

"Pettiness" seems to be the driver of the news continuing into its third week.  When will it stop? I want to make it clear to my friends, this country and abroad, that I have called the President much worse words than "moron" to my best friend, so much worse that I am sure they would not be printed by AOL in the interest of acceptability.  I make no apologies. ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: What A Human Can Do

To play football at Gainesville State in Texas you gotta’ be a tough kid. You also must be a convicted felon. Truth is Gainesville State is a reform school for “troubled youth.” They don’t play any home games and, when they travel, the only crowd that comes with the Tornadoes are 12 deputy sheriffs. Several years ago they wiggled onto Grapevine Faith’s schedule. The two teams ... (click for more)