Traces Of The Trade Documentary At Hunter Museum Thursday

Monday, September 17, 2007

The Back Row Film Series continues Thursday with Traces of the Trade: a Story from the Deep North, with words from filmmaker Katrine Browne, who chronicled her own family's connection to the slave trade.

Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North is a feature documentary in which Producer/Director Katrina Browne tells the story of her New England ancestors, the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history. Cameras follow as Ms. Browne and nine fellow descendants undertake a journey of discovery to Rhode Island, Ghana, and Cuba. Retracing the steps of the notorious Triangle Trade, uncover a family's, a region's, and a nation's hidden past. Simultaneously, viewers will follow descendants of the DeWolf family as they grapple with the contemporary legacy of slavery, not only for black Americans, but for themselves as white Americans.

Katrina Browne, Producer/Director, is the seventh generation descendant of Mark Anthony DeWolf, the family's first slave trader. She has a B.A. from Princeton University, where she studied cultural anthropology with a focus on oral history and a Masters in Theology at the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, California. Ms. Browne has worked with race relations and media experts to plan a national outreach campaign for community dialogue on race, ethnicity and equity and worked as a senior staff person at Public Allies, an AmeriCorps program, recruiting more young people and people of color into nonprofit careers.

A cash bar opens at 5:30 p.m. and the program begins at 6 p.m. Tickets are $10 for the general public. For Hunter members, AEC members and AEC Film Club cardholders, admission is $5. Tickets are available at the door, but seating is limited. Call 267.0968 to buy tickets in advance.

The Hunter Museum of American Art is located at 10 Bluff View.

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