Battle Of Chickamauga Commemorates 146th Anniversary

Monday, August 24, 2009

Several events are planned for the commemoration of the 146th anniversary of the Battle of Chickamauga.

Thursday, Sept. 17
Chickamauga Battlefield Tour, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Explore the Chickamauga Battlefield and discover details of the second bloodiest battle of the American Civil War by participating in a ranger led driving tour. The driving tour will begin at Tour Stop #2 on Battleline Road.

Prewar life on the Chickamauga Battlefield, 6:30 p.m.
Learn why cotton wasn’t king on the Chickamauga Battlefield by exploring the social and political leanings of local civilians. Park Ranger Christopher Young will offer a one hour program beginning at Tour Stop #3.

Friday, Sept. 18
Chickamauga Battlefield Tour, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Explore the Chickamauga Battlefield and discover details of the second bloodiest battle of the American Civil War by participating in a ranger led driving tour. The driving tour will begin at Tour Stop #2 on Battleline Road.

“Failure in the Saddle:” Forrest and Minty at Jay’s Mill, 1 p.m.
Near the site of the opening of the Battle of Chickamauga, Park Ranger Christopher Young will examine the consequences of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest’s failure to screen the Army of the Tennessee’s movements on the afternoon of September 18, 1863. The one hour walking tour begins at the Jay’s Mill site.

“Here We Made a Stand:” Alexander’s Bridge: Wilder’s Lightning Brigade, 3 p.m.
On the afternoon of Sept. 18, 1863, General W.H.T. “Shot Pouch” Walker’s Confederates attempted to take Alexander’s Bridge from Colonel John T. Wilder’s “Lightning Brigade.” Park Ranger Lee White will explore the significance of these actions during a one hour walking tour beginning at the intersection of Alexander Bridge Road and Viniard-Alexander Road.

Reconstruction and Chickamauga, 6:30 p.m.
Historians Dr. Daryl Black and Lindsey Brown will join Park Rangers Patrick Lewis and Lee White in presenting a two hour walking and driving tour discussing connections between important figures in the Battle of Chickamauga and “the war after the war” (also known as Reconstruction.) The tour will begin at the Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center.

Saturday, Sept. 19
Chickamauga Battlefield Tour, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Explore the Chickamauga Battlefield and discover details of the second bloodiest battle of the American Civil War by participating in a ranger led driving tour. The driving tour will begin at Tour Stop #2 on Battleline Road.

Jay’s Mill to Brock Field, 10 a.m.
Some of the most intense action of the Battle of Chickamauga occurred along the Brotherton Road. Park Ranger Jim Blackwell will discuss the actions in a one hour walking and driving tour along Brotherton Road. Please wear sturdy shoes and bring water.

Sam Watkins, “Co. Aytch,” and the 1st Tennessee, 1 p.m.
See Chickamauga through the eyes of famous memoir writer Sam Watkins. Park Ranger Patrick Lewis will recount stories of Watkins and the men of his famous “Company Aytch.” This 90 minute walking tour will begin at the picnic area at the intersection of Brotherton and Alexander Bridge Roads. Please wear sturdy shoes and bring a bottle of water.

“Driftwood in Squall:” A.P. Stewart’s Breakthrough, 3 p.m.
On the afternoon of September 19, 1863, General A.P. Stewart’s “Little Giant” Division came close to tearing the Union Army in half in some of the fiercest fighting of the Battle of Chickamauga. Park Ranger Lee White will lead a 90 minute walking tour of the actions. The program will start at Brock Field, off of Brotherton Road.

“A Pity to Kill Men So:” Viniard Field, 5 p.m.
Robertson’s Texas Brigade and Benning’s Georgia Brigade assaulted Union Troops of Colonel John T. Wilder’s famous “Lightning Brigade” in some of the most intense fighting of the battle. Park Ranger Christopher Young will further examine these actions in a one hour walking tour. This program will begin at Tour Stop #5, The Heg Monument.

“Hell’s Broke Loose in Georgia:” Cleburne’s Night Attack, 6:30 p.m.
General Patrick Cleburne’s Division participated in one of the few night time assaults of the Civil War during the final hours of fighting on September 19, 1863. Park Ranger Lee White will begin the one hour walking tour in the picnic area at the intersection of Brotherton and Alexander Bridge Roads. Please wear sturdy shoes and bring a bottle of water.

Sunday, Sept. 20
Chickamauga Battlefield Tour, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Explore the Chickamauga Battlefield and discover details of the second bloodiest battle of the American Civil War by participating in a ranger led driving tour. The driving tour will begin at Tour Stop #2 on Battleline Road.

Breckinridge’s Assault on the Union Left, 9 a.m.
Join Park Ranger Jim Blackwell for a one hour walking tour exploring the area where Maj. General John C. Breckinridge led the first Confederate assaults of the decisive second day of the battle. Please wear sturdy shoes and bring a bottle of water. The walking tour begins at the Visitor Center.

“Dark and Bloody Ground:” Kentucky Divided, 10 a.m.
The Bluegrass State sent men into both the Union and Confederate armies, some of whom, including President Lincoln’s brother-in-law, fought at Chickamauga. Park Ranger Patrick Lewis will explore the division of Kentucky at Chickamauga in a 90 minute walking tour. The tour will begin at Tour Stop #2, Battleline Road. Please wear sturdy shoes and bring a bottle of water.

“Unsurpassed Grandeur:” Longstreet’s Breakthrough, 11 a.m.
In the late morning hours of Sept. 20, 1863, Lieutenant General James Longstreet’s assaulting Confederates caused one-third of the Union Army to flee from the battlefield. Park Ranger Lee White will lead a 90 minute, two mile walking tour of this action beginning at Tour Stop #3. Please wear sturdy shoes and bring a bottle of water.

“The Death of a Warrior Poet:” W.C. Oates and W.H. Lytle, 1 p.m.
On Sept. 20, 1863, Colonel Oates and his regiment assisted in the attack on the Union brigade of General William H. Lytle, who was famous for his poetry prior to the Civil War, specifically Antony and Cleopatra. Park Ranger Christopher Young will conduct a one hour, half mile walking tour of the area, beginning in the recreation field parking lot. Please wear sturdy shoes and bring a bottle of water.

Rock of Chickamauga: Snodgrass Hill, 5 p.m.
The actions along the hills near the Snodgrass Cabin, during the afternoon and evening hours of Sept. 20, 1863, sealed an army’s fate. Park Historian Jim Ogden will lead a 90 minute, two mile walking tour across the slopes of Snodgrass Hill. The tour begins at the Snodgrass Cabin, near Tour Stop #8. Please wear sturdy shoes and bring a bottle of water and a flashlight.

Kate Cumming and Nursing at Chickamauga, 6:30 p.m.
Two weeks after the Battle of Chickamauga, Nurse Kate Cumming visited field hospitals on the battlefield. Join Park Ranger Anton Heinlein for a one hour program on Kate Cumming and her observations of the horrors of battle casualties. This program will be presented at the Snodgrass Cabin, near Tour Stop #8.

Living History Demonstrations
Cavalry Demonstrations:
Meet a group of Confederate Cavalrymen as they discuss the role and tactics used by cavalry during the Battle of Chickamauga. Demonstrations will be held in the McDonald Field near the Visitor Center. Programs will be held throughout the day.

Medical Program:
Living historians portraying the 17th Ohio Regimental Field Hospital encamped at the Snodgrass Cabin will provide programs interpreting the role of a regimental field hospital. Medical equipment used in a field hospital will be on display.

Infantry and Artillery Demonstrations “The Action at the Kelly Crossroads”:
Elisha Kelly’s farm became the scene of the most sustained action of the Battle of Chickamauga, particularly on the last day of the battle. As the Union right collapsed, the forces engaged around the Kelly Farm continued their own bloody fight, unaware of other battlefield occurrences. Living Historians will illustrate roles of Union artillery and Confederate infantry while Park Historian Jim Ogden narrates the historical action, on the very ground where these events took place 146 years ago. These programs will occur along Battleline Road at the south end of the Kelly Field.

Union artillery demonstrations:
Saturday at 9:45 a.m., 11:15 a.m., 12:45 p.m., 2:15 p.m., 3:45 p.m.
Sunday at 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.

Confederate infantry demonstrations:
Saturday at 10:30 a.m., 12 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 3 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Sunday at 10:45 a.m., 12:15 p.m., 1:45 p.m. and 3:15 p.m.

In case of inclement weather, alternative programming will be offered inside the visitor center. Inquire at the visitor center information desk for more information.

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park was established in 1890 by the veterans that fought here 145 years ago. The purpose of its establishment as stated in the enabling legislation is, “To preserve for historical and military study the sites of some of the most remarkable maneuvers and most brilliant fighting of the Civil War.”

Moccasin Bend National Archeological District was established in 2003. The purpose of its establishment as stated in the enabling legislation is, “In order to preserve, protect, and interpret for the benefit of the public the national significant archeological and historic resources located on the peninsula known as Moccasin Bend, there is established as a unit of Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, the Moccasin Bend National Archeological District.”


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