Marquette Basketball Transfer Maymon Enrolls At Tennessee

Friday, January 15, 2010 - by special report to The Chattanoogan

KNOXVILLE -- Tennessee basketball coach Bruce Pearl announced Friday that Marquette transfer Jeronne Maymon (pronounced: jur-ON MAY-min) is enrolled at UT, attended classes Friday and could be eligible to play for the Volunteers next season after the conclusion of the 2010 fall term.

NCAA residency requirements call for student-athletes who transfer from four-year institutions to sit out for one full academic year before becoming eligible to compete athletically. Maymon is, however, immediately eligible to practice with the Vols.

“We’re very excited to have Jeronne join our program,” Pearl said. “He is a very productive forward who can score inside and out. He’ll bring toughness and another level of physicality to our team.”

A 6-6, 240-pound forward from Madison, Wis., Maymon signed with Marquette as part of the Golden Eagles’ 2009 recruiting class. He appeared in nine games off the bench for Marquette this season before deciding to transfer after the fall semester. He averaged 4.0 points and 4.2 rebounds per game while shooting 48.1 percent from the floor.

“When I first came down and visited with coach Pearl, he seemed really genuine and convinced me that I could make this my new home,” Maymon said. “He talked to me about how this was more than just a basketball decision, and his words really appealed to me.

“I’m going to bring a whole new level of toughness to this team. I’m energetic, and I just want to be the best team player I can be. I’m going to listen to all the advice I get from the coaches and players and do everything I can to improve.”

As a prep standout at Madison Memorial High School, Maymon was a two-time Wisconsin player of the year. He led the Spartans to a 26-1 overall record and WIAA Division I Championship as a senior in 2008-09.

Maymon was a consensus top-100 prospect nationally and was rated as high as 46th nationally by Rivals.com.

(E-mail Stan Crawley at wscrawley@earthlink.net)


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