Missionary Ridge Local Train Rides Begin Saturday

Tuesday, February 02, 2010

Tennessee Valley Railroad begins the 2010 season Saturday with two Missionary Ridge Local Trains. The departures from Grand Junction are at 10:40 a.m. and 12:05 p.m.

The Missionary Ridge Local offers a "bite sized" train ride. At 50 to 55 minutes, this six-mile round trip packs a lot of history into a compact time frame.

Experience one of the original rail lines into Chattanooga. Along the way witness two unique methods of turning a train around: the better known turntable, and the wye (think of doing a three-point turn with your car and you're close). One of the highlights of the trip is riding through 1858-era Missionary Ridge Tunnel, a.k.a. the Chattanooga, Harrison, Georgetown, and Charleston Railroad Tunnel, especially noted for it's uniqueness as a horseshoe tunnel. The bottom of the tunnel actually pinches in so that as it rises, the sides curve out before curving back in to form the roof.

Also receive a guided tour of the East Chattanooga Back Shop after watching the turntable demonstration.

The Missionary Ridge Local trip length is typically 50-55 minutes and the motive power is vintage diesel locomotive. The roundtrip time includes the layover in East Chattanooga where passengers view the turntable demonstration and the conductor gives a tour into the restoration shop.

Tickets at $15 for adults and $9 for children age 3-12. There is no charge for children under age three. Tickets are purchased as walk-up only on the day of the trip. The boarding location is Grand Junction Station in Chattanooga at 4119 Cromwell Road off of Jersey Pike.


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