Books On Early Hamilton County, Tn. Settlers By John Wilson

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

John Wilson, former county historian for Hamilton County, has written two volumes on the early families of Hamilton County and also a book on Lookout Mountain.

The first is Hamilton County Pioneers. Compiled from Mr. Wilson's dozens of articles on early Hamilton County settlers, this book features 140 families and over 9,000 names.

Hamilton County Pioneers includes:

A Adams, Allison, Anderson
B Barker, Bean, Beason, Beck, Bell, Berry, Bird, Blackwell, Boyce, Brabson, Brown
C Cannon, Carter, Chesnutt, Clift, Coulter, Cowart, Cozby, Cravens, Crutchfield, Cummings
D Daughtery, Divine, Douglas, Dugger
E Eldridge, Elsea
F Faidley, Fields, First Settlers, Foster, Foust, Fouts, Frazier, Frist, Fryar
G Gamble, Gann, Gardenhire, Gillespie, Glass, Gothard, Green, Guthrie
H Hair, Hamill, Harris, Hartman, Henderson, Hillsman, Hooke, Hughes, Hunter
I Igou
J James, Johnson, Jones, Justice
K Kaylor, Kelly, Kesterson, Key, Kirklen
L Lattner, Lauderdale, Lee, Legg, Levi, Lewis, Light, Long, Lusk, Luttrell
M Maddux, Mahan, Massengale, Millsaps, Montgomery, Moon, Moore, McCallie, McDonald, McDonough, McGill, McMillin, McRee
N Nail
P Palmer, Parham, Parker, Patterson, Poe, Puckett
R Ragsdale, Rawlings, Rawlston, Rice,
Roark, Roddy, Ross, Rowden
S Sawyer, Selcer, Shepherd, Shipley, Simmerman, Sivley, Skillern, Sniteman,Snow, Standifer, Stringer, Sylar
T Tallant, Tankesley, Taylor, Thurman,
Trail of Tears, Trewitt
V Varnell, Varner, Vaughn, Vinson
W Walker, Wallace, Wells, White, Whiteside, Williams, Wolf
Y Yarnell.

Early Hamilton Settlers is the second volume. It has over 14,600 names and includes:

Alexander, Andrews Raiders, Arnett, Barnes, Bisplinghoff, Blunt, Blythe, Bolton, Bowers, Boyd, Boydston, Bradfield, Bradford, Brown, Bryant, Burchard, Bush, Cameron, Campbell, Card, Carper, Carr, Cate, Champion, Chandler, Cleveland, Cocke, Coleman, Condra, Conner, Cookson, Cooley, Corbin, Corbitt, Crabtree, Davis, Denney, Dobbs, Doyle, Dragging Canoe, Edwards, Elder, Eustice, Evans, Evatt, Fitzgerald, Ford, French, Fulton, Gilliland, Goins, Grenfield, Gross, Hancock, Harvey, Hickman, Hixson, Hogan, Holder, Hutcheson, Julian, Kennedy, King, Kunz, Lenoir, Lewis, Lightfoot, Lowe, Martin, Matthews, Milliken, Mitchell, Monger, McBride, McNabb, McWilliams, Padgett, Parrott, Peak, Pearson, Pendergrass, Priddy, Ragon, Ramsey, Rice, Roberts, Rogers, Roy, Ruohs, Ryall, Schneider, Smith, Talley, Teenor, Tyner, Vail, Vandergriff, Van Epps, Vaughn, Vineyard, Walling, Warner, Watkins, Webster, Wilkins, Wisdom, Witt, Woodward.

The book includes several families that are among the most difficult to sort out - because of the many different branches and families of the same name here. These include Hixson, Smith, Brown, Davis and Conner. The Hixsons were among the county's earliest settlers and have been among the most prolific.

This is the second volume on the families of Hamilton County by Mr. Wilson. The books, printed by Sheridan Books, are hardbound and include a complete index of names.

Hamilton County Pioneers is $35 each and $4 tax for Tennessee residents. Early Hamilton Settlers is $25 and $3 tax for Tennessee residents.

The paperback Scenic, Historic Lookout Mountain is available for $20.
Please include $2 sales tax if a Tennessee resident for the Lookout Mountain book.

From:

John Wilson
129 Walnut Street, Suite 416
Chattanooga, Tn., 37403

Phone 266-2325 (prefix 423)

Please include $3 for shipping and handling



Signal Mountain Genealogical Society Presents Book

The Signal Mountain Genealogical Society presented the book Order of First Families of North Carolina Registry of Ancestors by John R. Brayton, The book contains research information from the days when Tennessee made up the western-most portion of North Carolina.  Many of the residents of Signal Mountain can trace their families to that time and location.  Betty Fassnacht, ... (click for more)

TSLA Releases a New Digital Collection Showcasing Tennessee Folklife

What do roley hole marbles, white oak baskets, shape-note singing, and banjoes have in common? All are examples of Tennessee folk culture or "folkways" available online in the Tennessee State Library and Archives’ newest digital collection: "Tennessee State Parks Folklife Project Collection, 1979-1984." The collection documents folk culture unique to Tennessee and highlights Tennessee's ... (click for more)

County Schools Have Plan To Put Security Cameras At Every School

The Hamilton County Schools have a plan to put security cameras in every school, Supt. Rick Smith told the County School Board Thursday night. He said the money would come from the $2,201,000 the schools received last year from the sale of the old Ooltewah Elementary School property. The proposal must get approval from the School Board at the December meeting, then from the ... (click for more)

Lookout Mountain, Ga., Raises Sewer Rates; Joins In Kudzu Fight

The Lookout Mountain, Ga., City Council on Thursday night approved an increase in sewer charges. The council approved ordinance 281 increasing sewer rates to $6 per 100 cubic feet of water from the previous rate of $4.77.  The new increase will be in effect in January 2015.    City Manager Brad Haven said the town will be replacing the flow meter for ... (click for more)

Don't Allow Us To Be Overrun By People Who Do Not Belong Here - And Response (2)

Thank you, Senator Corker, for your clear, concise evaluation of the president's attempt to bypass Congress and personally and independently establish national policy that violates our current immigration laws.   Our long-standing failure to enforce our laws to control illegal immigration across our southern border has made this country less safe and ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Quick! Arm Our Guards

When I learned last Wednesday that Chattanooga’s leading hospital, in a ridiculous attempt to be more “family friendly,” planned to disarm its security guards. I was aghast but decided to wait for the proper “incident” to illustrate how stupid members of our “free thought society” can sometimes be. It took exactly one week. A bit after midnight on Thursday morning a gunman appeared ... (click for more)