Books On Early Hamilton County, Tn. Settlers By John Wilson

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

John Wilson, former county historian for Hamilton County, has written two volumes on the early families of Hamilton County and also a book on Lookout Mountain.

The first is Hamilton County Pioneers. Compiled from Mr. Wilson's dozens of articles on early Hamilton County settlers, this book features 140 families and over 9,000 names.

Hamilton County Pioneers includes:

A Adams, Allison, Anderson
B Barker, Bean, Beason, Beck, Bell, Berry, Bird, Blackwell, Boyce, Brabson, Brown
C Cannon, Carter, Chesnutt, Clift, Coulter, Cowart, Cozby, Cravens, Crutchfield, Cummings
D Daughtery, Divine, Douglas, Dugger
E Eldridge, Elsea
F Faidley, Fields, First Settlers, Foster, Foust, Fouts, Frazier, Frist, Fryar
G Gamble, Gann, Gardenhire, Gillespie, Glass, Gothard, Green, Guthrie
H Hair, Hamill, Harris, Hartman, Henderson, Hillsman, Hooke, Hughes, Hunter
I Igou
J James, Johnson, Jones, Justice
K Kaylor, Kelly, Kesterson, Key, Kirklen
L Lattner, Lauderdale, Lee, Legg, Levi, Lewis, Light, Long, Lusk, Luttrell
M Maddux, Mahan, Massengale, Millsaps, Montgomery, Moon, Moore, McCallie, McDonald, McDonough, McGill, McMillin, McRee
N Nail
P Palmer, Parham, Parker, Patterson, Poe, Puckett
R Ragsdale, Rawlings, Rawlston, Rice,
Roark, Roddy, Ross, Rowden
S Sawyer, Selcer, Shepherd, Shipley, Simmerman, Sivley, Skillern, Sniteman,Snow, Standifer, Stringer, Sylar
T Tallant, Tankesley, Taylor, Thurman,
Trail of Tears, Trewitt
V Varnell, Varner, Vaughn, Vinson
W Walker, Wallace, Wells, White, Whiteside, Williams, Wolf
Y Yarnell.

Early Hamilton Settlers is the second volume. It has over 14,600 names and includes:

Alexander, Andrews Raiders, Arnett, Barnes, Bisplinghoff, Blunt, Blythe, Bolton, Bowers, Boyd, Boydston, Bradfield, Bradford, Brown, Bryant, Burchard, Bush, Cameron, Campbell, Card, Carper, Carr, Cate, Champion, Chandler, Cleveland, Cocke, Coleman, Condra, Conner, Cookson, Cooley, Corbin, Corbitt, Crabtree, Davis, Denney, Dobbs, Doyle, Dragging Canoe, Edwards, Elder, Eustice, Evans, Evatt, Fitzgerald, Ford, French, Fulton, Gilliland, Goins, Grenfield, Gross, Hancock, Harvey, Hickman, Hixson, Hogan, Holder, Hutcheson, Julian, Kennedy, King, Kunz, Lenoir, Lewis, Lightfoot, Lowe, Martin, Matthews, Milliken, Mitchell, Monger, McBride, McNabb, McWilliams, Padgett, Parrott, Peak, Pearson, Pendergrass, Priddy, Ragon, Ramsey, Rice, Roberts, Rogers, Roy, Ruohs, Ryall, Schneider, Smith, Talley, Teenor, Tyner, Vail, Vandergriff, Van Epps, Vaughn, Vineyard, Walling, Warner, Watkins, Webster, Wilkins, Wisdom, Witt, Woodward.

The book includes several families that are among the most difficult to sort out - because of the many different branches and families of the same name here. These include Hixson, Smith, Brown, Davis and Conner. The Hixsons were among the county's earliest settlers and have been among the most prolific.

This is the second volume on the families of Hamilton County by Mr. Wilson. The books, printed by Sheridan Books, are hardbound and include a complete index of names.

Hamilton County Pioneers is $35 each and $4 tax for Tennessee residents. Early Hamilton Settlers is $25 and $3 tax for Tennessee residents.

The paperback Scenic, Historic Lookout Mountain is available for $20.
Please include $2 sales tax if a Tennessee resident for the Lookout Mountain book.

From:

John Wilson
129 Walnut Street, Suite 416
Chattanooga, Tn., 37403

Phone 266-2325 (prefix 423)

Please include $3 for shipping and handling



Dalton, Ga. Featured In Old Post Cards

Dalton, Ga., is featured in four old post cards that were sent by a traveling minister to his home-bound sister in North Carolina. Mabel Snead Smawley had a hobby of collecting post cards and brother, Albert Snead, often obliged her. He sent four from Dalton on Feb. 12, 1906. The post cards, featuring Dalton scenes that are actual photos, was published by George W. Horan ... (click for more)

Guided Bicycle Tour on Environmental History September 15

The Chattanooga History Center will partner with Outdoor Chattanooga to offer a bicycle tour on Tuesday, September 15, 2015.  "An Environmental History of Chattanooga" will be guided by Caroline Sunderland, Senior Educator at the CHC, and Outdoor Chattanooga staff and volunteers. Registered participants will meet at Outdoor Chattanooga (200 River St, Chattanooga, TN 37405) ... (click for more)

East Ridge High School Football Field North Stands Condemned; Next Home Game To Be Moved

The main stands at the East Ridge High School football stadium have been condemned. The field was being used for pee wee football on Saturday, but the north section was roped off for safety purposes. Fans at the games were watching from metal bleachers on the opposite side. Officials said some fans had complained about the condition of the old concrete facility, including ... (click for more)

Assessor Bennett, Former Assessor Ramsey In Jetton Camp For Assessor Of Property

Assessor of Property Bill Bennett and former Assessor Claude Ramsey recommended Sterling Jetton as the next assessor at a breakfast fundraiser at Wally's Restaurant in East Ridge on Saturday morning. Mr. Jetton, who spent 27 years in the assessor's office, is running against County Commissioner Marty Haynes in the March 1 Republican primary. Noting the political heavyweights ... (click for more)

Vote To Save Graduate Medical Education Funding

As a resident physician at UT College of Medicine Chattanooga, I know first-hand the impact Medicare financing for Graduate Medical Education has on physician education and access to care for patients in our community and communities all over the country.  GME funding provides medical school graduates the opportunity to complete the required years of clinical residency training ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: ‘Black Lives Matter’ To Me

Between the time a 14-year-old boy was shot four times late Sunday afternoon on 7 th Street and a 20-year-old reputed gang member was killed Tuesday night on Willow Street, there appeared in my morning reading an article on “Black Lives Matter.” I read it because I mourn over what the black community continues to struggle with in both our city and our country. It is an article, ... (click for more)