11 Days To 11.11.11 Veterans Day: How Did Veterans Day Start?

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

According to the United States Veterans Administration, World War I officially came to an end at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918 with the German signing of the Armistice. And from that day, November 11 has been regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.”

Meanwhile, the citizens of Chattanooga chose to build a performance hall and civic facility as a living memorial to World War I veterans. The cornerstone was laid for Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Auditorium on Nov. 11, 1922. And the building opened for public use in 1924.

In 1954, Congress passed legislation to change Nov. 11 from “Armistice Day” to Veterans Day and honor American veterans of all wars. Later that year, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued the first “Veterans Day” Proclamation.

And after several renovations throughout the years, Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Auditorium was rededicated to veterans of all wars.

Next time you visit Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Auditorium to see a Broadway show or concert, look for the dedication wall in the main lobby honoring Chattanooga’s veterans for their service and sacrifice.

For more information about 11.11.11. Veterans Day or Chattanooga’s Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Auditorium, or the City of Chattanooga Department of Education, Arts & Culture contact Melissa Turner 423 425-7826 or turner_m@chattanooga.gov.


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