State Library And Archives To Host Workshop On DNA Testing

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

For the second year in a row, Tennessee State Library and Archives is set to host a free workshop focusing on DNA testing for genealogical research. The workshop will take place in the auditorium of the State Library and Archives building, 403 Seventh Ave. North, in downtown Nashville, directly west of the State Capitol. The workshop will be Feb. 18 from 9-10:30 a.m.

This session is recommended for those who attended last year's session or who fully understand the basics of DNA testing.

J. Mark Lowe will be the guest speaker again this year, assisted by John F. Baker, Jr.

"Individuals interested in genealogy make up a large portion of the State Library and Archives' customer base," Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett said. "This workshop will offer advanced training in the use of DNA to enhance genealogical research."

Mr. Lowe is a distinguished professional researcher. He is an instructor at the Institute of Genealogical & Historical Research at Samford and Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy. He is a native of Robertson County and a volunteer for its archives. Recently, he was a featured researcher on an episode of the popular network genealogy program "Who Do You Think You Are?" featuring singer Lionel Richie.

Mr. Baker is the local author of The Washingtons of Wessyngton. Wessyngton was a very early and very large plantation in Robertson County, near Springfield. He gives speeches around the country and has helped numerous individuals discover their lineage. Among his discoveries were his grandmother's paternal grandparents, Emanuel and Henny Washington, who had been enslaved on Wessyngton Plantation.

"Research at TSLA is all about documentary evidence," State Librarian and Archivist Chuck Sherrill said. "DNA testing provides a new opportunity to use scientific evidence in conjunction with documentary evidence. Many of our users who have been working on tracking down family lines for years have begun to do DNA testing as a way of verifying their findings or of trying to make connections to other groups who share their surname."

This is a free workshop, but reservations are required. To make reservations, please email workshop.tsla@tn.gov or call 615/741-2764. Seating is limited. Limited parking is available in front, beside and behind the building.


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