Red Clay State Park Hosts Annual Pow Wow This Weekend

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Red Clay State Park will host its Annual Pow Wow this weekend, featuring traditional Native American dance, food and arts. 

Sponsored by the Friends of Red Clay and the Native American Services of Tennessee, the event will include traditional dancers, storytelling, living history demonstrations and more. In addition to musicians and dancers, the festival will feature craftspeople selling their wares and handicrafts at various vendor booths, along with a number of games and activities for the whole family.

The festival is free and open to the public on Saturday and Sunday, with a $5 parking fee per vehicle or motorcycle. Activities will begin at 10 a.m. each day. Friday will be a School Day, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. and is designed for all students, teachers and school faculty members. Reservations for schools are recommended. For information, please call Red Clay’s park office at 423 478-0339. 

“Red Clay’s 2012 Pow Wow is a great opportunity to educate families and students about Native American history and the key role it played in shaping Tennessee,” said Carol Crabtree, park manager.  “The festival is a way to preserve this heritage for future generations, and we have a talented roster of artists, performers and craftspeople on hand for this year’s event.”  

Native American arts and crafts will be demonstrated and sold throughout the event.  Traditional and festival foods also will be available, along with some old favorites.  Park visitors should bring a blanket or chairs, along with sunscreen and protective shades.  Cash is accepted for purchases, with some booths accepting personal checks.  For more information and specific event times and activities at Red Clay’s 2012 Pow Wow, please call the park office. 

Red Clay State Historic Park is located in the extreme southwest corner of Bradley County, just above the Tennessee-Georgia state line, and is the site of 11 of the last 12 Cherokee Council meetings before the infamous Trail of Tears.  The park encompasses 263 acres of narrow valley and forested ridges and features picnic facilities, a loop trail and amphitheater.  The park also contains a natural landmark, the Blue Hole Spring, which arises from beneath a limestone ledge to form a deep pool that flows into Mill Creek.  The Cherokee used the Blue Hole Spring as their water supply during council meetings.  For more information about the park, please visit www.tnstateparks.com/RedClay/.

 

Tennessee’s 54 state parks and 82 natural areas span the state from the Appalachian Mountains to the Mississippi River and offer an array of diverse natural, recreational and cultural experiences, including hiking, camping, boating and golfing.  Celebrating its 75th Anniversary this year, the Tennessee State Parks system was established through legislation in 1937.  Today, there is a state park within an hour's drive of just about anywhere in the state, with features such as pristine natural areas and a variety of lodging and dining choices.  For more information, visit Tennessee State Parks' website at www.tnstateparks.com.


Rock City’s Enchanted MAiZE Reopens Sept. 25

Rock City’s Enchanted MAiZE reopens on Thursday, Sept. 25, at Blowing Springs Farm every   Thursday   through   Sunday through Nov. 2. Back for its 13th season, this fall’s new maze design is a crop circle and holds a hidden code that visitors can try to break by going to Rock City’s social media pages for clues. Get lost in the corn and enjoy a fall festival ... (click for more)

Marble Springs State Historic Site To Host John Sevier Days Living History Weekend

Marble Springs State Historic Site will host a weekend of Living History in celebration of the life and times of the first governor of Tennessee, John Sevier, in commemoration of his 269th birthday. John Sevier Days Living History Weekend will take place Saturday, Sept. 20, from 10 a.m.– 5 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 21, from 12–5 p.m. You can expect to enjoy 18th century demonstrations ... (click for more)

City Receives $400,000 Federal Grant To Study Passenger Train Service

The United States Department of Transportation has announced Chattanooga has received a $400,000 Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant to study the potential use of existing railways for a passenger rail system in Chattanooga. There were 72 awards announced in 46 states and Washington, D.C. Out of numerous grant applications across Tennessee, ... (click for more)

Former Assistant Police Chief Eidson Not Charged In Shooting Of Stepson On Englewood Avenue

Former Chattanooga Police Department Assistant Chief Kirk Eidson was not charged in the shooting of stepson Robert Ingle, 18, on Sunday morning in North Chattanooga. However, Ingle was charged with domestic assault and vandalism. In the incident shortly after 9 a.m. at 1049 Englewood Ave., Mr. Eidson said Ingle came to the house asking him to take him to their other house ... (click for more)

Dirt Decision At Camp Jordan May Come Back To Haunt East Ridge Councilmen

Wow. I thought the arrival of Bass Pro Shop would help bring East Ridge back to a position of prominence in the Chattanooga area, but the Council proved otherwise last night.  To the council - There is a reason that the developers want that dirt: It's valuable . You currently own it and the developer wants it. Bass Pro has already agreed to set up shop. They were going ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Goodbye To My Scooter

The month of August turned out to be unkind, with my dog, my favorite aunt and my magnificent mother all dying within three weeks’ time. As I finally begin to push out the three newest dents in my soul, my habit has been to write something akin to a goodbye note to those I have loved. I’m not ready for Aunt Martha and Mother yet – not by a stretch -- but I remembered Scooter with ... (click for more)