Red Clay State Park Hosts Annual Pow Wow This Weekend

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Red Clay State Park will host its Annual Pow Wow this weekend, featuring traditional Native American dance, food and arts. 

Sponsored by the Friends of Red Clay and the Native American Services of Tennessee, the event will include traditional dancers, storytelling, living history demonstrations and more. In addition to musicians and dancers, the festival will feature craftspeople selling their wares and handicrafts at various vendor booths, along with a number of games and activities for the whole family.

The festival is free and open to the public on Saturday and Sunday, with a $5 parking fee per vehicle or motorcycle. Activities will begin at 10 a.m. each day. Friday will be a School Day, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. and is designed for all students, teachers and school faculty members. Reservations for schools are recommended. For information, please call Red Clay’s park office at 423 478-0339. 

“Red Clay’s 2012 Pow Wow is a great opportunity to educate families and students about Native American history and the key role it played in shaping Tennessee,” said Carol Crabtree, park manager.  “The festival is a way to preserve this heritage for future generations, and we have a talented roster of artists, performers and craftspeople on hand for this year’s event.”  

Native American arts and crafts will be demonstrated and sold throughout the event.  Traditional and festival foods also will be available, along with some old favorites.  Park visitors should bring a blanket or chairs, along with sunscreen and protective shades.  Cash is accepted for purchases, with some booths accepting personal checks.  For more information and specific event times and activities at Red Clay’s 2012 Pow Wow, please call the park office. 

Red Clay State Historic Park is located in the extreme southwest corner of Bradley County, just above the Tennessee-Georgia state line, and is the site of 11 of the last 12 Cherokee Council meetings before the infamous Trail of Tears.  The park encompasses 263 acres of narrow valley and forested ridges and features picnic facilities, a loop trail and amphitheater.  The park also contains a natural landmark, the Blue Hole Spring, which arises from beneath a limestone ledge to form a deep pool that flows into Mill Creek.  The Cherokee used the Blue Hole Spring as their water supply during council meetings.  For more information about the park, please visit www.tnstateparks.com/RedClay/.

 

Tennessee’s 54 state parks and 82 natural areas span the state from the Appalachian Mountains to the Mississippi River and offer an array of diverse natural, recreational and cultural experiences, including hiking, camping, boating and golfing.  Celebrating its 75th Anniversary this year, the Tennessee State Parks system was established through legislation in 1937.  Today, there is a state park within an hour's drive of just about anywhere in the state, with features such as pristine natural areas and a variety of lodging and dining choices.  For more information, visit Tennessee State Parks' website at www.tnstateparks.com.


Rock City Installs Newest Commissioned Sculpture Combining Art, Nature And Folklore

Rock City’s most recent commissioned artwork has just been installed where guests can now enjoy a new sculpture along the Enchanted Trail. Artist Matthew Dutton was selected earlier this year to create a new exhibit for the park, which he has entitled Maloria, Mother of the Wild. Mr. Dutton was chosen anonymously out of several artists to commission a piece tying in art, nature ... (click for more)

The Tennessee Aquarium’s 2016 Serve And Protect Event Is Sept 15

The Tennessee Aquarium and several of Chattanooga’s top restaurants are gearing up for the Serve and Protect event on Thursday, Sept. 15. It takes a lot of preparation to organize a special evening that pairs a live cooking show with an elegant seafood dinner in one of the Aquarium’s galleries.  Longtime friends, chefs Virginia Willis and Tamie Cook, will make mouths water ... (click for more)

Red Bank Commercial Centers Sell For $9.4 Million

Two nearby Red Bank retail centers have sold for a combined $9.4 million. Red Bank Mayor John Roberts called it "the largest transactions in the history of Red Bank." The Red Bank Town Center at 3901 Dayton Blvd., that includes a Food City, sold for $7,750,000. The sale was  to White Realty & Service Corp from Red Bank Ii Llc. A commercial center that includes ... (click for more)

Jury Awards 25 City Police Personnel Total Of $562,000 On Claims That Pay Plan Was Not Followed

A Chancery Court jury on Wednesday gave a verdict totaling $562,000 for 25 city police personnel who filed suit almost five years ago alleging that the city never lived up to terms of a 2010 pay plan. Attorney Stevie Phillips, who tried the case along with Janie Parks Varnell, said, "The jury awarded each officer what we had asked for to the penny." She stated, "These 25 members ... (click for more)

Alexander Should Do Something About The Affordable Health Care Act Price Increase - And Response (3)

Re:  Alexander's remarks about Tennesseans not affording "Affordable Health Care Act" prices Mr. Alexander,  Your message stated, Tennesseans can't afford a 44 percent to 62 percent increase in the Affordable Care prices.  I simply ask, as Senate Health Committee chairman, why don't you do something about it?  Don't tell us something most know already.  ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Abused By An EpiPen

It is a good guess that for about 30 years I have kept an EpiPen on the top of my refrigerator. I have never had to open the box, much less jab a dose of life-saving epinephrine into a person suffering from anaphylaxis. Whether it is a bee sting, peanut butter, shellfish or other allergies, I watched somebody come within inches of dying in my early 20s and swore I would have one ... (click for more)