Bill Lea Presents Workshop At Chattanooga Photographic Society November Meeting

Monday, November 12, 2012

Bill Lea will present a workshop on the Florida Everglades at the Chattanooga Photographic Society meeting on Thursday. 

Everglades National Park was the first national park established for its unique biological qualities. While most parks feature grand mountain vistas, scenic streams and/or spectacular waterfalls, the biological diversity of the temperate and tropical flora and fauna truly defines the Florida Everglades. It may not boast the majestic scenes present in other parks, but instead, the Everglades’ allure is characterized by its more subtle tranquil beauty. A wide array of tropical flora and a wealth of wildlife abound against a backdrop of the world’s largest freshwater marsh. With more than 350 species of birds present in the park, it is a birder’s paradise. Mr. Lea is passionate about the Florida Everglades with its countless photographic opportunities. The subtle but incredible wonder of this sub-tropical setting presents a variety of challenges for photographers.

Capturing intimate images of wildlife, scenery, wildflowers, and a variety of other natural subjects in “just the right light” has long been the trademark of Mr. Lea’s photography. 

He may best be known for his artistic documentation of deer and bear behavior, the various moods of the Great Smoky Mountains, and southern ecosystems.  Photographing in the Smokies since 1975 has afforded him limitless opportunities to observe and record the flora, fauna, and scenery of the region. Mr. Lea’s craft reflects his deep appreciation for nature and he communicates his enthusiasm and expertise as a natural history photographer and writer to others through his books, workshops, feature articles and civic presentations.  He has been teaching photo workshops at Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont since 1992.

More than 7,000 of Mr. Lea’s photos have been presented in an array of books, calendars, magazines, advertisements and other publications.   His work has appeared in Audubon Calendars, BBC Wildlife, Defenders of Wildlife, Exploring the Smokies, National Geographic books, Nature Conservancy, National Wildlife, and many others.  His three front covers in a row was a first in Field & Stream’s more than one hundred year history. Mr. Lea authored a coffee-table book titled Great Smoky Mountains Wildlife Portfolio and co-authored Great Smoky Mountains Wonder and Light and The Ultimate Guide to Digital Nature Photography.  

His newest book, Cades Cove – Window to a Secret World is in its fourth printing.  He is currently working on a book about the Florida Everglades. When asked what he would like most to achieve through his photography, Mr. Lea replies, “I hope my images will promote a better understanding and appreciation for wildlife, the natural world, and most of all, our Creator.”

The presentation will begin at 7 p.m. at the St. John United Methodist Church, 3921 Murray Hills Drive, Chattanooga, Tn. 37416.  

For more information, call 423 344-5643 or e-mail Dan Jeter at president@chattanoogaphoto.org.    


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