State Library and Archives Continues Thanksgiving Weekend Tradition

Monday, November 19, 2012
 
Everyone has had their fill of turkey. No one can bear the thought of another trip to the mall. So what else is there for a family to do on a Thanksgiving weekend?

If you’re in the Nashville area Saturday, you may want to visit the Tennessee State Library and Archives (TSLA) for its second annual ‘Family History Day.’ During the event, State Librarian and Archivist Chuck Sherrill and TSLA’s expert research staff will give people tips on how to get started in genealogy research so they can learn more about the ancestral bonds they share with the people who were sitting across the Thanksgiving dinner table from them.

The event, which is free and open to the public, will be held from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Saturday at the TSLA building, 403 Seventh Avenue North, just west of the State Capitol in downtown Nashville. Sherrill will conduct a workshop on family research from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. in TSLA’s auditorium.

“I encourage families to participate in this great holiday weekend event,” Secretary of State Tre Hargett said. “Thanksgiving is a time when we celebrate our nation’s history. This event allows people to focus on their personal histories as well. Participants who spend a day at this workshop may end up developing a hobby that lasts for a lifetime. As our staff at TSLA will tell you, genealogical research can be very addictive. And it’s a lot healthier than an extra serving of dressing.”

Sherrill and his staff will outline how family records, oral history, courthouse filings, library sources, web sites and other materials can be used to trace a person’s roots and organize the information that’s collected through research. Attendees are encouraged to bring any notes and information they have already collected about their families.

Sherrill has 30 years of experience as a librarian, archivist and genealogist. He is the author of more than 20 books on various topics of historical interest. He was appointed to his post in 2010.

Because seating is limited, reservations for the workshop are required. To reserve a spot, call (615) 741-2764 or e-mail shop.tsla@tn.gov

Parking is available around the TSLA building.


First Thanksgiving in Chattanooga (Civil War)

By “first Thanksgiving Day”, no, I do not mean the harvest thanksgiving meal which the Separatist colonists of New Plymouth shared uncomfortably with their Wampanoag neighbors.   Nor do I mean any of the thanksgivings proclaimed on a one-time basis by a U.S. President after that.   In this case, the “First Thanksgiving Day” means the inaugural event of those that have ... (click for more)

Chester Martin Remembers Larry V. Myers And His Explorer Scouts

I can't believe that it has been over 40 years since Larry Myers of the Chattanooga Fire Department was active here in Chattanooga. He was a very well-known professional fireman   who also took great interest in our local youth, organizing some of them into a group of re-enactors. I was fortunate to see them in action, especially at Fort Loudoun, where their authentic ... (click for more)

Officer Who Was Shot Returned Fire; Is Recovering Well; Shooter Still On Loose

Chattanooga Police Chief Fred Fletcher said Monday morning that the officer who was shot three times on Thursday is recovering well.   Chief Fletcher said the officer was wearing a bullet-proof vest and one bullet hit the vest, which protected him during the shooting.  The officer was able to return fire, although Chief Fletcher would not comment on how many bullets ... (click for more)

Chattanooga Man With 5 Violent Felonies Gets 30 Years In Prison

A Chattanooga man with five violent felonies on his record has been sentenced to serve 30 years in prison. Demetrius Joiner, 30, was given a 20-year sentence by Judge Curtis Collier after he was ruled to be an Armed Career Criminal. Judge Collier said the term would be consecutive to several state sentences imposed earlier on Joiner, including 10 years for aggravated robbery. ... (click for more)

Signal Mountain Couldn't Manage Public Education

I have been reading the buzz about Signal Mountain and other small municipalities considering a move to form their own school district within their municipal boundaries.  It is quite the comedy hour considering the notion that small cities that for decades could not even manage small sewer systems or 911 districts, are somehow going to do a better job with public education ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: School Board Can’t Wait

It took the Hamilton County School board nine months before the group hired a search firm to find a new superintendent. But you mark my words – the Department of Education will undoubtedly implode if our leaders wait another nine months simply hoping for some type of mystical salvation. In the last week Signal Mountain leaders have all but given notice they will form their own district ... (click for more)