Commemoration Events For The 149th Anniversary Of The Battles For Chattanooga

Tuesday, November 06, 2012

Here are events that will celebrate the 149th anniversary of the Battles for Chattanooga:

Saturday, Nov. 17:

Point Park Guided Walking Tour – 11 a.m., 1 p.m., and 3 p.m.

Explore the Campaign for Chattanooga from the perspective of Union and Confederate troops as they struggled for control of the “Gateway to the Deep South.”  This forty-five minute walking tour begins inside the Point Park Entrance Gate.

Cravens House – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Visit the historic Cravens House, situated on the slopes of Lookout Mountain, to learn about Robert Cravens’ family and the “Battle Above the Clouds” that was fought on their property.

“A Vicious Little Battery:” The Union Artillery on Moccasin Bend during the Siege and Battles for Chattanooga– 9 a.m.

Union artillery, firing from fortifications on the southern-most hills of Stringer’s Ridge on Moccasin Bend, helped keep the Confederates at bay during the Siege of Chattanooga and then assisted in prying the Confederates from Lookout Valley and Lookout Mountain during the Battles for Chattanooga.  Join Park Historian Jim Ogden for a two-hour walking tour to explore some of the earthen fortifications to learn how “a vicious little battery” essentially dominated the looming bulk of Lookout Mountain to the south.  The tour begins from the parking area along Moccasin Bend Road just north of the Moccasin Bend Mental Health Institute – look for the “Special Event” signs and the park ranger who will direct you into the parking area.

“The Tallest Fighting I Was Ever In:” Lookout Mountain

1 p.m.

On the morning of November 24, 1863, General Joseph Hooker’s Union forces were ordered to make a “demonstration” against Confederate forces defending the slopes of Lookout Mountain.  Join Park Volunteer Ansley Moses on a ninety minute walking tour of the “Battle Above the Clouds.”   This tour begins at the Cravens House parking lot.

Lookout Mountain – “The Nature of Battle” – 1:30 p.m.

Join Park Ranger Lee White for a two-hour, two-mile hike from Cravens House to the Chattanooga Nature Center and Arboretum and explore some of the interesting historical and nature features that abound on this historic mountain. 

Capture of Confederate Works at Cravens House, Lookout Mountain, Nov. 24, 1863

Engaging the Attention of the Enemy:  Joseph Hooker’s Demonstration on Lookout Creek – 2:00 p.m.

While John Geary’s “White Star” Division moved to sweep the western slope of Lookout Mountain, Union Major General Joseph Hooker directed other troops to move against the main Confederate positions guarding the road bridges over the creek at the mountain’s northwest base.  Join Park Historian Jim Ogden for a two-hour, two-mile walk through part of the Lookout Mountain Battlefield that later became the perspective and foreground of artist James Walker’s mammoth painting, The Battle of Lookout Mountain.  The tour begins along Parker Lane off Brown’s Ferry Road – just south of Interstate 24, Exit 175 in Lookout Valley/Tiftonia.  Look for “Special Event” signs at and on Parker Lane. 

Sunday, Nov. 18:

Point Park Guided Walking Tour – 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.

Explore the Campaign for Chattanooga from the perspective of Union and Confederate troops as they struggled for control of the “Gateway to the Deep South.”  This forty-five minute walking tour begins inside the Point Park Entrance Gate.

Cravens House – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Visit the historic Cravens House, situated on the slopes of Lookout Mountain, to learn about Robert Cravens’ family and the “Battle Above the Clouds” that was fought on their property.


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