Pam Ladd Waiting Until End To Decide On "Chattanooga Village"

Monday, December 17, 2012

District 3 City Councilwoman Pam Ladd said Monday night she is waiting until all the information is in about the proposed $100 million "Chattanooga Village" until deciding how to vote.

She hosted a public hearing on the controversial topic to a large crowd at City Hall on Monday night.

The City Council is set to vote Jan. 8 on the 190-acre office, retail and apartment project at Highway 153 and Boy Scout Road.

Ms. Ladd said, "I need to wait until all the information is in. Things can change. This project has changed many times and it could change again."

Rick Hill of Bardstown, Ky., told the group about 70 businesses will be located at the development, though he said filling up the retail make take some time. He said the "village type" development is designed to be "flexible" and meet changing retail needs.

Some 2,000 employees will be at the site when it is fully developed and the annual tax contributions will be around $2 million, he said.

Roland Ebert, another expert brought in to redo the plan and make it more environmentally friendly, said the hilltops will be left, though there will be "a little bit of grading" at the top for the roadway.

There is to be a restaurant at the top of one hill.

Attorney Joe Conner, who represents the North Chickamauga Creek Conservancy, said he was told that TDOT has not given any approvals related to an entrance onto Highway 153.

City Traffic Engineer John Van Winkle said some traffic issues remain unresolved.

Members of the audience wondered what will happen to the wildlife at the site and noted that a 2005 TWRA study listed 18 acres at the site as a critical environmental area.

Developer Duane Horton said not all the financing has been firmed, though he said he is in talks with investment firms, pension firms and private equity investors.

No large tenant will commit until the zoning has been secured, the audience was told.

Several questioners wanted to know why the project is being "rushed through" and said there should be a delay until traffic issues are clarified.

The site is owned by Jack Lonas, who has a house on the wooded property.     


Habitat For Humanity Of Greater Chattanooga Greater Area And Thrivent Financial Partner To Improve A Family’s Life

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Chattanooga Area  has been awarded $67,000 from Thrivent Financial to support construction of a Habitat home for an area family, as part of the Thrivent Builds program. This is the eighth home in Chattanooga to be built, thanks to Thrivent’s support. Thrivent Builds with Habitat for Humanity is an ongoing multi-year, multi-million ... (click for more)

Real Estate Transfers For Jan. 22-28

NOTICE: The Hamilton County Register’s Office did not publish this data. All information in the Register’s Office is public information as set out in T.C.A. 10-7-503. For questions regarding this report, please call Chattanoogan.com at 423 266-2325. GI numbers, listed when street addresses are not available, refer to the location of transactions (book number and page number) ... (click for more)

Chance Loftis Set To Be Freed From Jail After Jury Finds Him Guilty Of Only Misdemeanor Charge

Chance Loftis is set to be freed from jail on Monday after a Criminal Court jury on Friday afternoon found him guilty of only a minor charge. Instead of murder in the death of 46-year-old Donald Rogers, the jury in the courtroom of Judge Don Poole found him guilty of the lesser charge of reckless endangerment. He was found not guilty of aggravated animal cruelty in the beating ... (click for more)

Dr. David Seaberg Steps Down From Position As Dean For UT College Of Medicine In Chattanooga

David M. Stern, MD, executive dean of the University of Tennessee College of Medicine at UT Health Science Center (UTHSC), and Kevin Spiegel, president and CEO for Erlanger Health System, announced that  David Seaberg, MD, will be stepping down from the joint positions of dean of the UT College of Medicine, Chattanooga, and senior vice president of the Erlanger Health System. ... (click for more)

It's Time To Insure Tennessee - And Response

Tennessee has a problem.  What is the value of saving the lives of 1,000 Tennesseans each year? That is exactly what can be expected if 176,000 Tennesseans gain health insurance through Insure Tennessee. A New England Journal of Medicine study showed that expansion of Medicaid was associated with a 6% reduction in yearly mortality for people in the 34-65 age group. Statistically, ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: What About The Ashes?

I attended my fifth funeral in the month of January the other day and, while I wish a lot of my friends would hang around a little longer, I was amused by the conversation in the pew before the service began. The question was “ … then what do you do with the ashes?” More and more people are being cremated and asking their loved ones to scatter their ashes -- more properly called ... (click for more)