Many Participate In Wreaths Across America

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Wreaths Across America was Saturday, and included events at national cemeteries across America. For the past seven years, citizens from all walks of life, have gathered at the cemeteries to place fresh wreathes, adorned with bright red ribbon, at the headstones of the veterans who died in service for freedom or lived full lives after fighting for our country. These wreathes represent the gratitude of today's Americans  for the sacrifices that they made.

Citizens purchase wreathes throughout the fall. They are sold by military organizations, both youth and adults, and by the Daughters and Sons of the American Revolution. Other groups work with the Wreathes Across America Association.  Lt. Richard Dyer, Civil Air Patrol location leader for the Association, hopes that the number of wreathes that can be placed will continue to increase each year.

Two groups that take a strong interest in this program are the Daughters and Sons of the American Revolution. These are the bloodline descendants of the original American veterans. Susan Daily, chairwomen of the Chattanooga Regents Council of the DAR, pointed out that participants were there to remember and learn from history. Attired in her sweatshirt emblazoned with the DAR initials she said that the DAR was there to work and take part in a ceremony that has so much meaning for the DAR organization.  

Tennessee President of the SAR and member of the John Sevier Chapter in Chattanooga Charles Damman spoke of what the young people present could learn from being there.

After the playing of TAPS and the removal of the colors, the audience moved to where the wreathes were to be laid. Long lines of citizens from WWII Purple Heart recipients to young children walking with their parents, cadets from the Army, Civil Air Patrol, Air Force, Marines and Navy, solemnly placed their wreathes, stepped back and bowed their heads or saluted.



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