Bethlehem Center To Host Literacy Training For Community Organizations

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Bethlehem Center, a non-profit, faith-based community agency, is hosting a free training session to help schools, churches and other non-profit organizations improve the reading skills of children and young adults.

Bethlehem Center uses a technology-based program called Lexia Reading to dramatically improve literacy among local elementary school-aged children.

“Research in our region and throughout the nation repeatedly shows that literacy is a critical factor in reducing the rate of school dropouts, crime and gang activity,” said Lurone “Coach” Jennings, executive director and life coach of Bethlehem Center. “Students unable to read above the third-grade level are at a tremendous disadvantage at school and throughout life. We’re here to change that. The church must be involved in reducing illiteracy in order to help create a more moral and civil citizen for our community.”

Bethlehem Center and Front Porch Alliance, along with Maclellan Foundation, is hosting a one-day training program for educators, pastors and others who want to help kids read better. The training will be held Dec. 21 at Orchard Knob Elementary School, 400 N. Orchard Knob Ave., Chattanooga.

The center uses Lexia’s Assessment Without Testing technology, which provides personalized learning in five areas of reading instruction. Lessons are provided through multi-sensory scripts designed for teachers to use with students struggling with specific reading skills.

The program has made a difference.  A sampling of 49 first-to-third graders and 86 fourth-to-eighth graders using Lexia at the center for six weeks this past summer showed that the first group improved their reading skills from three percent to 30 percent of their grade level. The fourth- and fifth-graders saw an increase from 20 percent to 77 percent of their grade level while sixth-to-eighth grade students increased reading proficiency from 26 percent to 100 percent.

This literacy initiative is a local collaboration among organizations and partners, including Elders of the City, and churches of various denominations committed to supporting literacy with after-school and summer Lexia Literacy Labs. Older students and adults also benefit from the program as a means to help them achieve reading competency and productivity.

Training is scheduled from 8 a.m. to noon, with a pastor’s orientation from noon to 1 p.m. Interested churches, schools and organizations should call Yolanda Wade at 423 756-8545.

 


Marion County Democratic Party To Hold Yard Sale To Raise Funds For Candidates

The Marion County Democratic Party will be assisting its candidates for local elections this fall by raising funds for their campaigns.   There will be a yard sale in The First Volunteer Bank parking lot in downtown Jasper on Saturday, from  9 a.m.-3 p.m.   In addition to the sale, candidates will be on hand for meet and greets from  ... (click for more)

Another Successful Annual Training For HHB, 1-181st

The soldiers of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 1-181st Field Artillery Regiment returned to their home station armory in Chattanooga after completing a successful annual training exercise at Volunteer Training Site – Tullahoma.   During the course of the two week annual training the soldiers of HHB, 1-181st, commanded by CPT Justin G. Woodward and 1SG Danny Duncan, ... (click for more)

Strong Thunderstorm Causes Damage, Power Outages In Dalton

Shortly before  5 p.m. , a strong thunderstorm went through downtown Dalton, knocking down numerous trees, causing power outages and also causing damage. At this time, no injuries have been reported.  The Dalton Fire Department and Dalton Police Department responded to multiple reports of damage. The DPD closed several roads due to downed trees and power lines. ... (click for more)

Chattanooga Honors Military Veterans

A Memorial Day service was held at the National Cemetery on Monday. (click for more)

Parking Discrimination Downtown

Many taxpayers who reside in Chattanooga (but outside Chattanooga's core) feel left behind when it comes to neighborhood paving, sidewalks, policing, streetscaping, street sweeping, public transportation, and other services. Some think most tax dollars are spent on downtown and not in their neighborhoods. It's not as if they can't vicariously experience the largesse of downtown. ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: One Nameless Ghost

One hundred years ago the United States was at war. The most intense fighting during World War I was on what was called The Western Front. The Germans wanted to invade France from the north and in order to do it, they had to push through Flanders province in Belgium. It has been described as a hell unequalled in raw hand-to-hand combat, In just four months on Flanders fields, ... (click for more)