THP Prepares For New Year's Eve "No Refusal" Enforcement

Thursday, December 27, 2012

Five people lost their lives in vehicular crashes on Tennessee roadways during last year’s New Year’s Eve holiday period. 60 percent of those fatalities occurred in alcohol-related crashes. That is why the Tennessee Highway Patrol will join with local law enforcement agencies to conduct another “No Refusal” DUI enforcement campaign during the 2012-13 New Year’s Eve holiday, beginning at 6 p.m. on Friday, and concluding at midnight on Tuesday.

“No Refusal” is the latest enforcement strategy aimed at deterring impaired driving and reducing fatal crashes on Tennessee roadways. The law, passed this year by the General Assembly, allows law enforcement officials to seek search warrants for blood samples in cases involving suspected impaired drivers. Previous “No Refusal” enforcements in Tennessee have been held during several holiday periods this year, including the 4th of July, Labor Day, and Thanksgiving.  

“The Tennessee Highway Patrol’s eight district captains have worked tirelessly to coordinate this effort with local law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, judges and emergency services personnel in their respective regions,” Department of Safety and Homeland Security Commissioner Bill Gibbons said. “They take their duty to ensure the public’s safety seriously, and this enforcement effort is proof of their commitment.”

During the New Year’s Eve period, two counties from each of the eight THP Districts will participate in the No Refusal campaign, including Knox and Sevier (Knoxville District); Hamilton and Marion (Chattanooga District); Robertson and Wilson (Nashville District); Crockett and Tipton (Memphis District); Carter and Greene (Fall Branch District); Cumberland and Overton (Cookeville District); Bedford and Maury (Lawrenceburg District); and Chester and Carroll (Jackson District).  

Of the five people killed during last year’s New Year’s Eve period, three were not wearing safety restraints. In 2012, 52.4 percent of vehicle occupant fatalities are from unrestrained vehicle occupants in Tennessee. Additionally, alcohol related crashes are on the rise across the state. There have been 7,567 alcohol crashes already this year. That is an increase of 182 more impaired driving crashes (2.5%) than this time last year.

“State Troopers will be aggressively looking for impaired drivers during the New Year’s holiday. Also, we will be making every effort to remind citizens to buckle up. Alcohol and seat belt usage are contributing factors in too many crashes across the state. Our goal is to save lives this holiday season and to usher in the New Year on the right foot,” Colonel Tracy Trott said.

In 2011, an estimated 262 people died in Tennessee traffic crashes involving a driver or motorcycle rider with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher. That is a 7.4 percent decline from the 283 impaired driving deaths in 2010, and a 12.4 percent decline from the 299 impaired driving deaths in 2009.

As of Dec. 27, preliminary statistics indicate that 1,000 people have died on Tennessee roadways in 2012, an increase of 70 deaths compared to 930 fatalities at this same time a year ago. An early estimate of impaired driving fatalities this year reveals that 238 people have died in vehicular crashes involving alcohol. 

Statistics for the 2011-12 New Year’s Holiday period accompany this release, along with an attachment of sobriety and driver license checkpoints scheduled throughout the holiday period.  

The Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security’s mission is (www.TN.Gov/safety) to ensure the safety and general welfare of the public.  The department encompasses the Tennessee Highway Patrol, Office of Homeland Security and Driver License Services. General areas of responsibility include law enforcement, safety education, motorist services and terrorism prevention.  


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