Lee Davis: 6th Circuit Court Of Appeals: Is Evading Arrest A Violent Felony?

Saturday, May 19, 2012 - by Lee Davis
Lee Davis
Lee Davis
This case concerns whether a defendant’s prior conviction for evading arrest is a “violent felony” for purposes of the Armed Career Criminal Act (ACCA). If it is the consequences for a subsequent federal conviction are large. Despite having previously ruled that evading arrest is a violent felony and then having the Supreme Court vacate the Sixth Circuit’s judgment, the Court ruled again that under Tennessee law it is a violent felony.

In this case, defendant David Earl Doyle was found by police in 2007 parked behind a church sleeping in a running vehicle. Deputies saw a pistol in the driver’s side door and a shotgun lying between the driver and his sleeping female companion.
The officers removed the weapons before arresting the two on various charges. A few weeks later a federal grand jury indicted Doyle and charged him as a felon in possession of a firearm, alterations to the barrel of a firearm (sawing off a shotgun), and possession of an unregistered firearm. Doyle pled guilty.

At sentencing the district court ruled Doyle was an armed career criminal (ACCA) under the guidelines because of his three prior convictions that qualified him for an enhanced sentence: aggravated assault, burglary and a Class E felony of evading arrest. The district court sentenced Doyle to 180 months on count one and 120 months for counts two and three, to run concurrently. 

Doyle agrees that his previous convictions for aggravated assault and burglary qualify as violent felonies under the ACCA. The issue is whether evading arrest qualifies as a violent felony. 

Under the ACCA a violent felony is “any crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year” that has as an element the use of physical force against another  “or otherwise involves conduct that presents a serious potential risk of physical injury to another.” Class E felony evading arrest can only be considered a violent felony under this catchall provision. 

The Sixth Circuit previously address just such a question in U.S. v. Rogers, holding that in Tennessee a Class E felony evading arrest is a “crime of violence” under the guidelines.  While Doyle claims Rogers was wrongly decided he does not attempt to distinguish a case that is otherwise identical to the fact pattern present here. Though Rogers was remanded by the Supreme Court no new opinion has been issued on the case and therefore the Supreme Court’s ruling has an undetermined impact.
The Court’s majority founds that the portion of the ACCA discussing “serious potential risk of physical injury to another” applies in this case. The Court says such potential risks to officers are always present in vehicular-flight cases. Such risk is inherent in such situations as flight is in defiance of police instructions and the vehicles can be used in a way to cause serious potential risks of injury to others. 

Despite what the Supreme Court wrote in Rogers, the Sixth Circuit has decided that nothing should cause a reconsideration of their holding in Rogers and that Class E felony evading arrest under Tennessee law is a violent felony under the ACCA.

To read the full opinion, click here.
See Our Related Blog Posts:

6th Circuit Appeals Court Upholds Child Pornographer’s Life Sentence

(Lee Davis is a Chattanooga attorney who can be reached at lee@davis-hoss.com or at 266-0605.)



Representative Carter Receives Tennessee District Attorneys' Public Safety Advocate Award

The state’s 31 district attorneys have recognized state Rep. Mike Carter with the Public Safety Advocate Award. The Public Safety Advocate Award is given to a legislator who "recognizes the necessity of protecting our citizens and takes action to advance public safety." “Representative Carter is keenly aware of the public safety issues faced by Tennesseans on a daily basis. ... (click for more)

Matthew Higgins Wins CARTA's Martin-Langley Service Award; Bus Drivers Say Concerns Still Not Been Addressed

Matthew Higgins has been presented the annual Martin-Langley Service Award. It is presented to a CARTA employee who exemplifies the utmost in public service. Mr. Higgins was presented a glass trophy during the CARTA board meeting. Also during the session, Jilll Hindman said she is concerned that a number of Care-A-Van drivers are leaving for other work. Several have ... (click for more)

UTC's College Of Business Receives $40 Million, The Biggest Gift In School History

The largest philanthropic gift in the history of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga has been made to the University’s College of Business by Gary W. Rollins and Kathleen Rollins of Atlanta. This historic, $40-million gift also marks the first college to be named at UTC. The University of Tennessee Board of Trustees, at its annual meeting in Knoxville on Friday, voted ... (click for more)

2 Chattanoogans Were Among 3 People Killed In Collision With Train In McMinn County

Two Chattanoogans were among three people killed when a car was struck by a train in McMinn County on Thursday afternoon. The Ford Fusion that was hit was driven by Wendy M. Humphreys, 45, of Chattanooga. She was not wearing a seat belt. Johnny M. Ashworth, 46, of Chattanooga was one of the passengers. Jasmine Ashworth was also in the car. She and Johnny Ashworth had on ... (click for more)

The Boss, Claude Ramsey

I try not to overuse the word great, but we lost a great man today, Claude Ramsey. I had the pleasure of serving under him as director of Commercial and Industrial Properties for 14 years while he was the Hamilton County Assessor of Property. He was probably the smartest person I have ever known. He was tough but patient, kind, caring and compassionate. He knew how to get ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Not A Blessed One

When I read, to no great surprise, that 132 of Chattanooga’s “leaders” had signed a letter in support of “socioeconomic integration” in Thursday’s Times Free Press, there were two things that were immediately obvious to me: Not a blessed one would have (a) written such a letter on their personal stationery, and (b) not a blessed one would have ever voted for the current president ... (click for more)