TBR Approves New Academic Programs At Chattanooga State

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Chancellor John G. Morgan of the Tennessee Board of Regents announced the approval of three new academic programs. Effective fall 2012, Chattanooga State Community College will offer an associate of Fine Arts (A.F.A.) degree with an area of emphasis in Music; an associate of applied science (A.A.S.) degree in Health Sciences; and an associate of applied science (A.A.S.) degree in Criminal Justice with two areas of concentration, Corrections and Law Enforcement.

According to Dr. Fannie Hewlett, Chattanooga State provost and vice president for Academic Affairs, “By adding these programs to the curricula, TBR is enhancing Chattanooga State’s ability to meet the educational needs of our students and motivate them to complete the degree of their choice.” 

The A.F.A. in Music was developed for the benefit of community college students with a desire to transfer to a music program at a four-year institution to earn a bachelor’s degree in Music. While transfer options have been available for music graduates with an associate of arts degree, the A.F.A. degree with an emphasis in Music creates common curricula in community colleges that transfer directly to public universities in Tennessee without question through the Tennessee Transfer Pathways. TTPs allow community college students to enroll as juniors in university music programs, if they successfully pass auditions, performance reviews, etc., required of students already attending the university.  

The A.A.S. in Health Sciences was designed to offer a gateway for upward mobility to Tennessee Technology Center graduates with a practical nursing (LPN), surgery technology, or medical assistant diploma. In addition, graduates with a technical certificate in pharmacy technology, emergency medical technician IV, or paramedic are eligible for enrollment. Students pursuing the A.A.S. in Health Science must have a license in their area of study. Those accepted into the program receive 30 hours of advanced placement credits toward the A.A.S. degree. They must also complete a general education component along with other courses.

The A.A.S. degree in Criminal Justice with two areas of concentration, Corrections and Law Enforcement is delivered through the Regents Online Campus Collaborative. The ROCC provides students access to courses/programs that they can easily accommodate to their busy lives.  Students choose a home campus, such as Chattanooga State, where they apply for admission, register for courses, and are awarded degrees, diplomas, or certificates. Students may elect to complete this program with a combination of on ground and online classes. Anyone currently working in corrections (probation, parole, etc.), law enforcement (police officer, security, etc.), or has a desire to pursue a career in these areas will benefit from either one of these programs.  

To earn more about the Tennessee Transfer Pathway, logon to www.tntransferpathway.org/. Additional details about the ROCC can be found at www.rodp.org/.

For information about Chattanooga State Community College and its educational programs, call the Chattanooga State information hotline at 697-4404 or toll free at 866.547-3733. Information is available on the Chattanooga State website at www.chattanoogastate.edu, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ChattState, and on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ChattStateCC.



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