UTC Orchestra Has Concert Oct. 4

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

The UTC Music Department will present the UTC Orchestra, directed by Jooyong Ahn, in the UTC Fine Arts Center, Roland Hayes Concert Hall, 752 Vine St., on Oct. 4 at 7:30 p.m. It is presented free of charge and is open to the general public.

The recital will include; “English Folk Songs Suite” by English composer Ralph Vaughan Williams, “Suite for Strings” by American composer Robert Washburn and Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 2 in D Major.” 

Written in 1923, the “English Folk Song Suite” is one of English composer Ralph Vaughan Williams’s most famous works for military band. Credited with establishing a new nationalist style based on English folk traditions, William’s sought inspiration from native material, including Elizabethan and Jacobean music as well as English folk songs. Originally published as “Folk Song Suite,” the title which is used on the score and parts, it consists of three movements: March, Intermezzo and another March, and is considered an important part of core literature for concert band as it treats traditional melodies with remarkable originality and charm. 

“Suite for Strings” is composed by American composer Robert Washburn, who taught for many years at State University of New York at Potsdam. He has performed with many well-known orchestras both nationally and internationally and is a prolific composer, with over 150 published works. His “Suite for Strings” is made up of four movements in varying moods from lyrical and gentle to vibrant and, is best described as a simple and charming piece; a delightful addition to the evening’s performance. 

Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 2 in D major (Op. 36)” was written between 1801 and 1802, mostly during his stay in the rural retreat of Heiligenstadt, Vienna in 1802, at a time in which his worsening deafness had been diagnosed as incurable and irreversible. Conducted by the composer on April 5, 1803, the work premiered in Theater an der Wien in Vienna composed without a standard minuet; instead, replacing it with a scherzo, giving the composition even greater scope and energy. Additionally, the finale marked allegro molto contains many of his own syncopated jokes, shocking the sensibilities of many of his contemporaries.  

Since 2004, Mr. Ahn has been a tenured professor of conducting and director of orchestras at UTC. A citizen of the United States and native of Seoul, South Korea, he has performed with several major orchestras around the world at many notable music venues. Mr. Ahn has held the music directorship of orchestras in Korea and the United States and guest conducted many orchestras on four continents. In addition, he has held many master classes and concerts worldwide, as well as worked with several youth orchestras. Most recently, his orchestra world premiered Harvey Stokes’ “Clarinet Concerto” at UTC and he conducted the Chattanooga premier of Scott Joplin’s opera “Treemonisha.” He recently served as visiting professor at Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea and was also invited to Harbin, China, in the summer of 2012, to guest conduct China’s oldest western instrument orchestra.

If you have a disability requiring accommodations or, for information regarding this or any other UTC Music Department performance, call the Music office at 425-4601 or see the Music Department website at http://utc.edu/music.



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