Parkridge East Offers Several Upcoming Childbirth Education Classes

Tuesday, January 1, 2013
Parkridge East Hospital will offer a number of childbirth education classes in the coming weeks. Classes include: 

Breastfeeding Class ($15 per couple) – Jan. 12 OR March 16, 10 a.m. – noon OR Feb. 7, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. - For either first-time or veteran parents, this class includes topics such as physiology of breastfeeding, advantages of breastfeeding, techniques for successful breastfeeding, common pitfalls and challenges, returning to work and pumping. Mothers are strongly encouraged to bring a support person, but it is not required. This class is free with any Labor of Love Lamaze class. 

Infant/Child CPR Class ($15)  - Jan. 19 OR Feb. 9 OR March 2, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. – An American Heart Association class taught at Parkridge East Hospital by a Basic Life Support Instructor, this course includes instruction on what to do in the event that your infant or child stops breathing or begins to choke. Injury prevention is discussed. This class is recommended for veteran as well as first-time parents, grandparents, and caregivers of a new baby. A practice time on manikins is included. Note: This class is NOT a certification for healthcare or day care workers. 

Labor of Love (Lamaze) Four Week Series ($50) – MONDAYS, Jan. 7—28 OR March  4 — 25, 6:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.– This class will prepare first-time parents for everything they will need to know about having their baby. The class discussion will include nutrition, labor, delivery, and postpartum care for Mom. This class also includes comfort techniques to be used during labor. Lamaze breathing and relaxation exercises will be practiced every week at the end of class. This is the ideal class for parents who think they might want to go without an epidural, but may not be sure. A support person is highly recommended to be in attendance with the expectant mother. Bring two pillows to class. Breastfeeding class is free when taking this class. A tour of the hospital is included during class.

Labor of Love (Lamaze) ONE DAY CLASS ($75) – Feb. 16, 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.  - This class is ideal for parents who don’t have the time for a 4-week series. Lamaze breathing and relaxation exercises will be practiced during class. A support person is highly recommended to be in attendance with the expectant mother. Bring two pillows to class. Breastfeeding class is free when taking this class. A tour of the hospital is included during class. 

Tours of the BirthPlace at Parkridge East (free) – available Jan. 12/March 16, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. OR Jan. 19/Feb. 9/March 2, 1:00 p.m. – 2 p.m.OR Feb. 2 5:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. Come get acquainted with the Parkridge East facility and take a walking tour with one of our nurses. You will tour the Labor and Delivery area and the Mother/Baby area (based on availability). Prenatal services and classes will be discussed with a time for questions and answers. This tour begins in the Rowe Conference Room. 

Boot Camp for Dads (free) – Call First Things First at 267-5383 for information. This class is a fun, free and informative session for Dads (rookie and veteran) about the ins and outs of being a great father. This class discusses the challenges that new fathers face, like uncontrollable crying (from baby and Mom), in-laws and living on little or no sleep. Led by a First Things First instructor, this is a guys-only event. 

Classes are subject to change or cancellation depending on class size; participants will be notified one week prior to class. If you do not receive a confirmation letter or phone call within two weeks of your class date, call MedLine at 800/242-5662. For more information and to register for classes, call MedLine at 800/242-5662

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