National Speaker Presents “Becoming Harriet Tubman” At McCallie School

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

McCallie School commemorates Black History Month in February and will kick off the month with a special presentation by Natalie Daise and her one-woman tribute to American hero Harriet Tubman. Miss Daise will give a presentation to the McCallie student body on Feb. 1. The public is invited free of charge to a Saturday evening performance Feb.

2 at 7 p.m. in the McCallie Chapel. 

Harriet Tubman was a leader in the Underground Railroad in the 1800s. The Underground Railroad was a network of people, both black and white, who helped slaves from the South escape to the North. Miss Tubman ran away from her owner in Maryland at age 29 and reached freedom in Pennsylvania. Over time, she made 19 return trips to the South and helped more than 300 slaves to freedom. 

In “Becoming Harriet Tubman,” Miss Daise portrays five people at different stages of Miss Tubman’s life. Through narrative and music, she tells the story of how a seemingly insignificant little girl becomes an historical icon. 

Miss Daise is a nationally-known storyteller, performer and speaker. She was a star of the children’s television show “Gullah Gullah Island” in the late 1990s which was named one of the 10 best children's shows by TV Guide in 1996. In 1997 it was nominated for a daytime Emmy Award in the outstanding preschool series category. 

“To become a person like Harriet, where you began is really important,” Miss Daise said in a May article in the Charleston Post and Courier. “In my show, I want people to see that you don’t have to be born with anything extra to become something special.”

 


Helen DeVos College Of Education Celebrates Student Teachers

The Helen DeVos College of Education at Lee University celebrated the accomplishments of its student teachers with a banquet in the Centenary Room on Lee’s campus. Student teachers, cooperating teachers and supervisors enjoyed the evening sharing the semester’s experiences with each other. Speakers for the evening included Cameryn Byrd, Lauren Suits, Jonathan Berry and Jared ... (click for more)

Lee University Named To President’s Service Honor Roll Once Again

The Corporation for National and Community Service announced that Lee University has been named to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, once again receiving recognition for its commitment to bettering the community through service. “Receiving this honor indicates that our students and faculty are engaging in transformative service with our community ... (click for more)

TVA Sues Cleveland's Allan Jones Over Dock, Retaining Wall, Boat Ramp, Boathouse On Hiwassee River

TVA has sued Cleveland, Tn., Check Into Cash millionaire W. Allan Jones Jr. over the construction of a dock, retaining wall, boat ramp and boathouse on the Hiwassee River. In the lawsuit in Federal Court, TVA said it told Mr. Jones before the construction was finished that he was on TVA property. The complaint says he has refused to move the construction from the river. ... (click for more)

Bobby Dodd Lawsuit Against City Moved To Federal Court

A lawsuit brought by former Chattanooga Police Chief Bobby Dodd against the city of Chattanooga and the Chattanooga Fire and Police Pension Fund over his pension has been moved to Federal Court. The lawsuit was earlier filed in Chancery Court by attorneys Jerry Tidwell and Adam Izell. The suit says former Chief Dodd opted for a plan that would have half of his pension go to ... (click for more)

Please Don't Close The Piccadilly Cafeteria At Hamilton Place - And Response

Oh, no. The Piccadilly Cafeteria at Hamilton Place is closing.  Its last day is Christmas Eve.  I will miss the great food they have there but most of all I will miss their servers, cashiers and waitresses.  They are all so friendly and accommodating.  They make it like it’s a home-style restaurant. I sure wish there was some way that Hamilton Place and ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: The Manger Scene Stays!

When the Freedom From Religion Foundation struck the tiny town of Jay, Fla., earlier this month, the town mayor had a life-sized Nativity scene that had been displayed every Christmas for the past 40 years taken down and sold as “city surplus.” But in Alabama, things are different. When the foundation tried the same thing in Rainbow City, Ala., more people than all those who live ... (click for more)