Lee Davis: Supreme Court Agrees To Hear Case Of Woman Who Poisoned Her Best Friend

Tuesday, January 29, 2013 - by Lee Davis
Lee Davis
Lee Davis
On Friday the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear an appeal by a woman convicted under a federal law that was meant to curb the existence of chemical weapons. The case is a convoluted one and involves the woman admitting she attempted to poison a former friend who she found out had an affair with her husband.

The law at issue in the case was enacted in 1998 and banned the use of chemical weapons for anything other than a “peaceful purpose.” The law developed from an international chemical weapons convention that was signed in 1993. The goal of the convention was to prevent terrorists from obtaining dangerous weapons of mass destruction.

The woman at the center of this sordid tale, Carol Anne Bond, was a microbiologist who previously worked with a major chemical company, Rohm and Haas.
After the police launched an investigation, she admitted to trying to poison her former best friend after learning that the woman had become pregnant by Ms. Bond’s husband.

Ms. Bond took chemicals from Rohm and Haas and spread them on the friend’s mailbox, car doors and house doorknobs over the span of nearly six months. Though cases like this are normally handled by local prosecutors as traditional criminal cases, Ms. Bond was prosecuted under the federal chemical weapons law.

The case presents an unusual opportunity for the justices to consider what to do when Congress’ power to implement international treaties into American law conflicts with the 10th Amendment limits on federal power. Ms. Bond, a Pennsylvanian, was sentenced to six years in prison after pleading guilty. She’s since appealed saying that use of the federal law invaded the powers given to Pennsylvania and other states under the 10th Amendment.

Earlier last year Ms. Bond’s case was heard by the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals which found that her conviction was constitutional. Though the court upheld her previous conviction, it did go out of its way to point out that the federal chemical weapons law turned each kitchen cupboard and cleaning cabinet into a potential chemical weapons cache.

Ms. Bond, who’s being represented by former Solicitor General Paul Clement, says that the federal government exceeded its authority by criminalizing what was local conduct when it implemented the chemical weapons treaty. The government disagrees, saying that Congress has authority under the Commerce Clause and the Necessary and Proper Clause to enact the law as it did.

Read: “U.S. Supreme Court Will Reconsider Case Of Woman Who Tried To Poison Romantic Rival,” by Robert Barnes, published at WashingtonPost.com.

(Lee Davis is a Chattanooga attorney who can be reached at lee@davis-hoss.com or at 266-0605.)


Chamber To Host Speed Networking Membership Luncheon

There will be a speed networking luncheon at the Walker County Civic Center at 11:45 a.m. on Feb. 23.  The event is sponsored by The Meeting Company, with special guest and emcee (and Walker County resident) Kim Carson from Sunny 92.3 FM. "Attendees have the opportunity to network face-to-face with each guest, exchanging business cards and information about their ... (click for more)

Whitfield County Installs New Kiosk For Renewing Car Tags

A new kiosk for renewing car tags is being installed at the Walnut Avenue Kroger through the Georgia Department of Revenue and Whitfield County Tax Commissioner’s Office. That location, instead of the Cleveland Highway Kroger, was chosen after a study by the kiosk company discovered the most residents, by far, live nearby. “For several years, I’ve been trying to get the state ... (click for more)

Charges Will Not Be Filed Against Officers In Javario Eagle Case

District Attorney General Neal Pinkston said Wednesday he will not file charges against the six Chattanooga Police Department officers involved in the Dec. 12, 2015, fatal shooting of Javario Eagle.  His office said, "An investigation conducted by the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office found use of deadly force by officers Lorin Johnston, Allen Griffith, Tim McFarland, Mitchell ... (click for more)

Medal Of Honor Museum Hopes To Finally Find Permanent Home At Coolidge Park

Officials of the National Medal of Honor Museum said Wednesday they hope to finally find a permanent home at Coolidge Park. Bill Raines said it is planned to build a two-story, 6,800-square-foot domed museum on two acres at the park. It will be dedicated to Medal of Honor recipient Charles H. Coolidge, who is now 94. There will be a sculpture of Mr. Coolidge - for whom the ... (click for more)

What Our Schools Are And Have Been Doing About Bullying

Bullying has been a widely discussed topic during the last few weeks in the wake of the incident involving the Ooltewah High basketball team.  Contrary to public opinion, Hamilton County Schools have not been passive in our efforts to address bullying now or for the past several years.  Unfortunately, bullying is a societal norm that is infiltrating our school community, ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Grab The Reaching Hand

Three of Tennessee’s largest four cities are now searching for school superintendents. Jesse Register retired last June and, after botching the first attempt, Nashville city leaders are intensely helping the Board of Education in a search for the best candidate. In Knoxville and Chattanooga the superintendents have resigned, both under a cloud, and now the leaders of the ‘2.0’ initiative ... (click for more)