New Adult Education Programming Offered At The Chattanooga Arboretum And Nature Center

Thursday, January 3, 2013

The Chattanooga Arboretum and Nature Center will be offering educational programming in January for adults in botany, biology, ecology, the arts and history, along with many other fascinating topics. 

Call 423 821-1160 ext. 0 to reserve a spot in the following classes. Some have a limited number of participants, so call early, and please watch the website for information concerning upcoming offerings. 

Owl ID Class

Date:  Jan. 5

Time:  2-3 p.m.

Ages:  12 +

Cost:  $10 Members; $8 Non members

Meet our resident owls up close—the Great Horned Owl, Barred Owl, Barn Owl, and Eastern Screech Owl.  Learn about these fascinating predators and what they each contribute to the balance of nature in our southeastern ecosystems.  Taught by Tish Gailmard, CA&NC Wildlife Curator. 

Winter Adaptations

Date:  Jan. 12

Time:  10 a.m.–12 p.m.

Ages:  16 +

Cost:  Members $15; Non members $20

Join CA&NC Director of Education Corey Hagen for a 2-hour class about adaptations animals have developed for survival during the winter months.  There will be an in-depth PowerPoint covering food storage, migration, hibernation, brumation and other important topics. Participants will observe some of these adaptations in our CA&NC animal ambassadors.  The program will be indoors except for a short hike to the Wildlife Wanderland.

Herpetology

Date:  Jan. 26

Time:  12–2 p.m.

Ages:  16 +

Cost:  Members $15; Non members $20

Corey Hagen, CA&NC Director of Education will help participants become better acquainted with the reptiles and amphibians that live in our backyards.  The presentation  will cover many snakes, frogs, toads, lizards, salamanders that live in this region and their adaptations for survival. Live animal ambassadors will help to illustrate the principles presented.  The program will take place entirely indoors.

Introduction to Sandhill Cranes

Date:  Jan. 26

Time:  2-3 p.m.

Ages:  Program geared to age 12 and up

Cost:  $10 Members; $12.00 Non members

Dr. David Aborn, UTC Professor and Ornithologist will teach a class based on his recent research about Sandhill Cranes. Topics to be covered include Sandhill Crane biology and their economic impact on the Hiawassee region. 

Photography 101

Date:  Jan. 27

Time:  TBA (3-4 hours)

Ages:  16+

Cost:  $25 Members; $30 Non members

Join professional photographer, Bob Hulse to learn the basics of outdoor photography.  Winter is a wonderful time for contrast and open views.  More details will be posted on the website.

Build a fairy house. Charming family activity – outside

Date:  Saturday, Jan. 12

Time:  1-4 p.m.

Location:  Chattanooga Arboretum and Nature Center

Cost:  CA&NC members - $10, nonmembers - $15 per family

What will happen:  We’ll learn a little bit about how fairy houses started.  You’ll receive a purse of fairy gold so that you can buy building and decorating materials in the fairy market place.  You and your fellow builders will explore the Arboretum grounds for just the right site, collecting Nature’s “cast off’s” along the way.  Feel free to bring natural materials from home but remember  they will stay at the Nature Center with your fairy house. Lots of fun. Preregistration required.  Call 423 821-1160 ext. 0 to register.  Check out fairy houses from around the country at www.fairyhouses.com.


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