U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service Proposes To List Hummingbird As Endangered

Friday, January 4, 2013
Honduran Emerald
Honduran Emerald
- photo by Greg Homel, Natural Elements Productions

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has proposed to list as endangered the Honduran Emerald hummingbird, a species endemic to five small valleys in Honduras and whose population is estimated to be fewer than 1,500 and decreasing.

The announcement follows the completion of a species status review (also known as the 12-month finding) by FWS. The announcement seeks information and comment from the public over the next 60 days on the proposed listing for this species. The action was prompted by an October 28, 2008 petition by two hummingbird conservation organizations and others, requesting the endangered listing. While an endangered listing would draw attention to the plight of the bird and the threats it faces, the practical benefits are limited since the U.S. Endangered Species Act has no force of law beyond U.S. borders.

The proposal specifically requests comments or information from the Government of Honduras, the scientific community, or any other interested parties concerning the bird, including: information on the species’ taxonomy, distribution, habitat selection (especially breeding and foraging habitats), diet, and population abundance and trends (especially current recruitment data); information on the effects of habitat loss and changing land uses on the distribution and abundance of this species and its principal food sources over the short and long term; information on whether changing climatic conditions (i.e., increasing intensity of hurricanes or drought) are affecting the species, its habitat, or its food sources; and information on the effects of other potential factors, including live capture and collection, domestic and international trade, predation by other animals, and diseases of this species or its principal food sources over the short and long term.

The most obvious factor threatening the continued survival of this species is a significant loss of habitat (90 percent) over the past approximately 100 years due to land conversion to plantations, agriculture, and cattle pastures. As of 2012, the population was estimated to be between 350 and 1,500 birds with a decreasing trend. For example, the Honduran Emerald’s habitat formerly encompassed a large extent of the Aguán Valley, a once pristine plain of nearly 1,800 square miles. However, as a result of the agricultural reforms of the 1960’s and 1970’s ninety percent of its original habitat in that area no longer exists in its original form due to the conversion of its habitat to banana plantations and cattle pasture. Much of the Honduran Emerald’s habitat is now on privately owned land and is often planted with non-native grasses for cattle foraging. Now, only a single forest remnant larger than 247 acres that is suitable for this species is known to exist in this valley.

On a positive note, the Honduran Emerald Habitat Management Area has been expanded by about 2060 acres and was reclassified as the Honduran Emerald Wildlife Refuge in 2011 by the Honduran Government. Further, between 2007 and 2008, this species was detected in five valleys of Honduras including two valleys in the Santa Barbara Department: the Quimistán Valley and Tencoa Valley where it had not been recorded since 1935.

The Honduran Emerald is one of more than 338 hummingbird species. It is a medium-sized (average length 3.7 inches) hummingbird with an iridescent green back, iridescent blue-green throat and red bill.
Comments may be submitted by one of the following methods:

Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments on Docket No. FWS-R9-ES-2009-0094.

- U.S. mail or hand-delivery: Public Comments Processing, Attn: FWS-R9-ES-2009-0094, Division of Policy and Directives Management; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, MS 2042-PDM; Arlington, Va. 22203.



Waterfowl, Migratory Bird Hunting Proposals Made During TFWC 1st Meeting In 2018

A preview of the 2018-19 waterfowl and other migratory bird hunting seasons was presented at the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission’s first meeting of the year. The two-day meeting concluded Friday at the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s Region II Ray Bell Building. Jamie Feddersen, TWRA’s Migratory Game Bird Program leader, gave the preview. Seasons and bag limits for ... (click for more)

25,000 Tennesseans Volunteer On Feb. 24 To Plant Trees In Tennessee's 95 Counties

Tennessee Environmental Council is promoting 250K Tree Day, a statewide event on Feb. 24 planting 250,000 trees with 25,000 Tennessee volunteers of all ages.  Tennessee’s growing population equates to more consumption and deforestation, officials said.  The Council’s Tennessee Tree Project was created to plant one million native trees across the state to help repopulate ... (click for more)

Ivy Johnson, 23, And Cordarrius Johnson, 26, Shot Early Sunday Morning On Lillian Lane

Ivy Johnson, 23, And Cordarrius Johnson, 26, were shot early Sunday morning.   Chattanooga Police were notified at 4:39 a.m. of two people arriving at a local hospital with gunshot wounds. Upon arrival, police spoke with the two victims who were suffering from non-life threatening gunshot wounds. The victims arrived at the hospital via personal vehicle.   ... (click for more)

From Green Window Shutters To Forks And Spoons, Mount Vernon Restaurant Up For Auction

From the green wooden window shutters to the forks, knives and spoons, the landmark Mount Vernon Restaurant is up for auction. Marc Gravitt, of Gravitt Auction, said there will be an online auction starting Thursday morning and running through Saturday at noon. It will be handled as a "staggered close," he said. The first item will go first, then the second 30 seconds later, ... (click for more)

DACA Or Amnesty To Become The Majority?

As we have the political drama that we see in D.C. let’s be honest about what DACA is all about. We understand as the liberal policies of abortion, dependency on the government and an anti-American globalist / progressive agenda that many have come to realize these policies no longer represent their core beliefs and have left a certain party. Without an influx of new dependency ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: What’s The ‘Super’ Done?

The headline on Jan. 10 in the Times Free Press read, “Report shows Hamilton County students still lagging behind Tennessee peers.” In smaller type underneath, the sub-head added, “Less than 33 percent of county elementary, middle school students read at grade level.” Then, just seven days later, this on Friday, the same newspaper bannered, “Hamilton County Schools superintendent ... (click for more)