Girl Scout Cookie Sales Begin Friday

Monday, January 7, 2013

Thin Mints, Samoas, and six other cookies are back as the Girl Scout Council of the Southern Appalachians launches its annual cookie program. 

Girls begin taking orders Friday. A new website, IWantCookies.org, allows customers who don’t know a Girl Scout personally to reserve cookies in advance. IWantCookies.org will also be ready to accept cookie reservations on Friday.

"Everyone knows how tasty Girl Scout Cookies are, but there’s more to our cookies than what’s in the box,” said the council’s CEO Booth Kammann. “Every box of cookies a girl sells is an investment in her future.”

Girls learn five key skills through the sale: goal setting, decision making, money management, business ethics, and the art of communicating with people.

“Girls will use these key skills throughout their lives,” Kammann said. 

Troops have spent months preparing for the sale, and every penny earned stays within the council area. Girls use their profits to fund educational activities, trips, community service projects, and more. The council’s proceeds provide essential services to girls and volunteers.

The iconic cookie boxes have been redesigned for the first time since 1999 to capture Girl Scouting’s role as the nation’s premier leadership experience for girls. Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer David Kennerly captured images of girls working together, traveling, and volunteering for the new boxes.

Also new this year, all customers may purchase and donate cookies to members of the Army National Guard and Air National Guard from Tennessee, Virginia, and Georgia through the “Building a Mountain of Hope” program. All cookies remain $3.50 per box, a zero-increase over last year’s price. 

Girl Scouts will take orders Friday-Feb. 10. Cookie deliveries and booth sales are March 1-24. For more information, visit girlscoutcsa.org or call  1-800-474-1912.



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