TVA Energy Advisory Panel To Hold First Session

Friday, October 11, 2013

The Tennessee Valley Authority’s new Regional Energy Resource Council will hold its inaugural meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 23, at the TVA Central In-Process Training Center in Hollywood. The panel, created by the TVA board of directors to advise the agency on current and future energy resource activities and help sort through competing objectives and values, will meet from 8:30 a.

m. to 4 p.m. CDT.  The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes a discussion of the purpose and scope of the new council, the energy resources in the Tennessee Valley, energy issues and concerns, and the agency’s development of a new Integrated Resource Plan that will determine TVA’s long-term energy goals and requirements.

The council has scheduled a 30-minute listening session at 1:30 p.m. CDT to hear opinions and views of the public. The Central In-Process Training Center is located at 29199 U.S. Highway 72 in Hollywood.

“This is an opportunity for people with diverse perspectives to come together and share concerns, issues and advice with TVA as it formulates energy policy decisions,” said Joe Hoagland, TVA vice president and designated federal officer for the council.

Persons wishing to address the panel are asked to register at the door by 12:30 p.m. on the day of the meeting. Handout materials should be limited to one printed page. Written comments may be mailed to the Regional Energy Resource Council, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT-11B, Knoxville, TN 37902.

The council members come from across the TVA service territory and bring a broad range of stakeholder views and backgrounds (See Regional Energy Resource Council for biographies). The 19 members, appointed last month by TVA President and CEO Bill Johnson, represent environmental, industrial, consumer, educational and community leadership interests. Council members will serve without compensation for a two-year term. The council will meet approximately twice annually.


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