Chattanooga Civil War Round Table Meeting October 15

Visit by Jefferson Davis to City is Topic

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

The Chattanooga Civil War Round Table will hold its regular monthly meeting on Tuesday, October 15, 2013.  The meeting is at 7 PM and will be held in the Millis-Evans Room of Caldwell Hall on the campus  of the The McCallie School (enter the campus from Dodds Avenue and follow the signs to the Academic Quadrangle and Caldwell Hall).  Historian Jim Ogden is the speaker.  Historian Ogden will speak on the visit Confederate President Jefferson Davis made to the Army of Tennessee outside of Chattanooga in October, 1863, an event 150 years ago this month.  The meeting is free and open to the public. 

            "It has pleased Almighty God to reward the valor and endurance of our troops by giving to our arms a complete victory over the enemy's superior numbers. Homage is due and is rendered unto Him who giveth not the battle to the strong.

            Soldiers, after two days of severe battle, preceded by heavy and important outpost affairs, you have stormed the barricades and breastworks of the enemy, and driven before you in confusion and disorder an army largely superior in numbers, and whose constant theme was your demoralization and whose constant boast was your defeat......We drop a soldier's tear upon the grave of the noble men who have fallen by our sides and move forward. Much as been accomplished. More remains to be done before we can enjoy the blessings of peace and freedom."

            So Braxton Bragg proclaimed to his troops in the heady days following the victory at Chickamauga. But, this public statement and determination and encouragement hid a very important fact. The dissension amongst its leaders that was wracking the Army of Tennessee had only been worsened by the battle in the valley of the River of Death. Bragg and his senior subordinates were at each others throats to an even greater degree and there were new players in the fight. So bad was it, so important was the campaign, that the President of the Confederate States of America felt compelled to leave his sick bed and come to the army to try to resolve the situation. It was not Jefferson Davis' first visit to the army, but it was perhaps his most critical and the ramifications of the visit would help set the stage for what happened about two and six weeks later in the shadow of Lookout Mountain and on the very slopes of Missionary Ridge where we meet. In his talk, "The President Visits the Army: Jeff Davis at Chattanooga, October, 1863," Historian Jim Ogden, in the 150th anniversary month of the visit's occurrence will look at Davis' visit to the Army of Tennessee and explore its reasons and effects. He'll address how both the officers and men of the army viewed the chief executive's visit and their expectations, real and imagined, and how they saw its outcome.

 

James Ogden, III, President

Chattanooga Civil War Round Table

 

{The Chattanooga Civil War Round Table is a group of area citizens interested in the study of the American Civil War.  The Round Table meets on the third Tuesday of each month, normally in the Millis-Evans Room of Caldwell Hall on the campus of The McCallie School on Missionary Ridge (enter off Dodds Avenue at Union Street).  At each month’s meeting, a historian or author from the region or from across the nation, or a member, makes a presentation on some aspect of the conflict.  The meetings are free and open to the public and membership in the Round Table is open to all with an interest in the era of the War Between the States.}

 



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