Building Cleveland Up Exhibit Explores Cleveland’s Turn-Of-The-Century Rebirth

Monday, October 21, 2013
The Cherokee Hotel (now Summit Building) circa 1942
The Cherokee Hotel (now Summit Building) circa 1942

At the end of the Civil War, Cleveland underwent a growth of infrastructure and culture that would last into the early decades of the next century. At the Museum Center of 5ive Points’ Building Cleveland Up exhibit, visitors will uncover the history of this growth from 1880-1930.  

Building Cleveland Up is sponsored by Landmark Insurance Group and Bank of Cleveland, and is scheduled to run from Oct. 25-Jan. 4. Admission is free for members, with regular admission for non-members. The Members-Only Opening Reception will be held Thursday at 6 p.m., and will include light refreshments, live entertainment, and a presentation by Curator of Collections Lisa Chastain.  

“Visitors may be amazed to learn that the city of Cleveland was dissolved in 1880, and had to rebuild, literally from the ground up, when it was reincorporated in 1882,” said Ms. Chastain. “How did Cleveland lose its charter? How did it reinvent itself two years later? How did local businesses and cultural institutions play a role in this reinvention? These are some of the fascinating question being asked—and answered—in this exhibit.” 

“We are thankful to once again partner with Bank of Cleveland, and are also very grateful to Landmark for their support of this exhibit,” said Executive Director Hassan Najjar.  

Featured artifacts will include posters and seating from the Princess Theater, and a working harness stitcher from W.C. Gannaway and Son Hardware Store.  

For further information call 339-5745, or visit www.museumcenter.org.


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