Three Tennessee Sites Added to the National Register of Historic Places

Thursday, October 24, 2013

The Tennessee Historical Commission announced three Tennessee sites have been added to the National Register of Historic Places. The National Register of Historic Places is the nation’s official list of cultural resources worthy of preservation. It is part of a nationwide program that coordinates and supports efforts to identify, evaluate and protect historic resources. The Tennessee Historical Commission administers the program in Tennessee.

“The National Register honors places that help Tennesseans understand our heritage and what makes our communities unique and enjoyable,” said Patrick McIntyre, executive director of the Tennessee Historical Commission. “We are confident this recognition will help retain these unique sites for future generations to know and appreciate.”

Sites recently added to the National Register of Historic Places include:

Memphis Bank and Trust Building – The Memphis Bank and Trust Building was designed by the Memphis architectural firm of Hanker and Heyer and completed in 1962. Twelve stories tall, the Modern Movement building is constructed of reinforced concrete and steel framing. Sheathed with an aluminum and glass curtain wall, polished granite is also used on the exterior of the building. Memphis Bank and Trust was established in 1949. The bank was primarily used as a vehicle for auto dealers to participate in auto financing, which had become a very profitable part of auto sales. As post-WWII auto sales expanded, so did the bank and their new building reflected their success. Memphis Bank and Trust was an important company in downtown Memphis’ mid-20th century economy.

Red Boiling Springs Bank – Constructed in 1928, during the peak era of prosperity for the resorts in the community, the success of the Red Boiling Springs Bank was tied to the success of the hotels and mineral spas of Red Boiling Springs. The bank was the only one in the community until the 1960s. The bank was established in 1919 by local businessmen, meeting in one of the resort hotels. Located prominently on a main road, the one-story brick building has Classical Revival detailing. As the resort industry faded and new industry came into Red Boiling Springs, the bank supported the new industry.

South Main Street Historic District (Boundary Increase) – Six historic commercial buildings were added to the South Main Street Historic District in Memphis. The historic district was first listed in the National Register in 1982. The South Main Street area in Memphis has undergone redevelopment and the rehabilitation of historic buildings in recent years, resulting in the need to revisit the original National Register nomination. Changes in the district are important for their commercial architecture and for their association with the late 19th and early 20th century railroad-related commerce of the city. Historic buildings added to the South Main Street Historic District include a warehouse, former hardware company buildings, a hotel and a U.S. Post Office field office building.

Links to each of the completed nomination forms can be found in the site descriptions listed above. For more information about the National Register of Historic Places or the Tennessee Historical Commission,

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