Tennessee Historical Commission Now Accepting Nominations for Certificate of Merit Awards

Friday, October 25, 2013

The Tennessee Historical Commission is now accepting nominations for its Certificate of Merit Awards to honor individuals or groups that have worked to preserve Tennessee’s cultural heritage during 2013. The deadline for submissions is December 31, 2013.

 “Although much of our work at the Tennessee Historical Commission focuses on efforts to preserve and to restore historic structures, we also want to recognize people for the work they do in the areas of publication, commemoration, and education to safeguard our history and heritage,” said Patrick McIntyre, executive director of the Tennessee Historical Commission.

The awards program recognizes individuals or groups throughout the state who have worked to conserve or highlight Tennessee’s cultural heritage during the past year. The awards recognize historic preservation projects as well as work in the field of history. Award recipients will be honored in 2014.

The Tennessee Historical Commission Awards program began in 1975. Certificates of Merit are presented annually to individuals, groups, agencies or organizations that have made significant contributions to the study and preservation of Tennessee’s heritage during the 12 months prior to the application deadline.

To make a nomination for a Certificate of Merit Award, please contact the Tennessee Historical Commission and request an application or visit http://www.tn.gov/environment/history/.
The Commission can be reached by calling 615-532-1550, by writing to 2941 Lebanon Road, Nashville, TN 37214, or by contacting Angela Miller via e-mail at Angela.Staggs@tn.gov.

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