Ducks Unlimited Partners With New South For Wetland Protection

Monday, October 28, 2013

One of Ducks Unlimited’s (DU) newest partners, New South Access and Environmental Solutions, could offer on-the-ground wetland projects even more protection, officials said. New South is the world’s leading environmental access company creating safe right-of-ways to environmentally sensitive areas.

By using the emtek Wetland Access System, New South logistic crews create a temporary pathway to work sites without disrupting the natural habitat. Crews lay mats to form a temporary roadway, never impacting the wetland. EWAS floats on vegetative wetlands leaving a footprint of only 3.5 psi – approximately half of that of a human footprint. This avoids unnecessary damage to wetlands and leaves the ecosystem intact. The EWAS does not restrict water flow, protecting the marsh plant and animal life.

“We are proud to have New South on board as one of our newest partners,” said Jim Alexander, DU’s senior director of corporate relations. “This partnership will provide wetlands engineers a new tool to use when needed on projects across North America.”

The conventional method of creating a right-of-way through a wetland is stacking traditional wood or composite mats. This process can compact soils, disrupt the wetland vegetation and crush root systems causing permanent damage to the wetland. By using the EWAS system, however, site workers have a roadway that does not damage sensitive wetland plants and vegetation.

“It’s only natural that the leader in wetland access and protection, New South, and the leader in wetlands conservation, Ducks Unlimited, would join forces through partnership,” said Drew St. John II, New South’s CEO. “Our alignment with Ducks Unlimited brings validity and prestige to our focus on reducing wetland loss and negative impacts to wetlands.”


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