Engineering Students Eligible For Scholarships Through American Council Of Engineering

Monday, October 28, 2013
The American Council of Engineering Companies of Tennessee (ACEC of Tennessee) is now accepting applications from engineering and land surveying students in Tennessee for several state and national scholarship programs.                 

“ACEC of Tennessee has always been committed to promoting the engineering profession in a variety of ways, including education,” said Jerry Stump, who chairs the committee that will review all scholarship applications submitted by Tennessee students. “We count it as a privilege to once again offer these scholarship programs.” 

The national scholarship program of the ACEC will award several scholarships totaling $20,000. The Council of Structural Engineers of ACEC will award a $5,000 scholarship to a structural engineering student enrolled in a Master’s degree program. ACEC of Tennessee will award up to two $1,000 scholarships. 

ACEC of Tennessee will announce its scholarship winners in March 2014. The national scholarship winners will be announced in October 2014. 

The 2013 ACEC of Tennessee scholarship winners were Caleb Drummer, a civil engineering student at UT-Knoxville and Nicholas True, a mechanical engineering student at UT-Chattanooga.   

To qualify for a scholarship, a student must be a U.S. citizen pursuing a Bachelor’s, Master’s, or Doctor of Philosophy degree in an engineering or land-surveying program in Tennessee approved by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.  Students must be entering their junior, senior, fifth or graduate year in the fall of 2014 to qualify.  Candidates for the Council of Structural Engineers’ scholarship must be enrolled in a Master’s degree program for Structural Engineering in the 2014 fall semester.


Southeast Bank Makes Contribution To CSCC

Southeast Bank provided a charitable contribution to Cleveland State Community College in the amount of $3,000 to go toward the awarding of annual scholarships to students.   (click for more)

Share America Foundation Supports Catoosa County Teen Maze

The Share America Foundation, Inc. donated $400 to the Catoosa County Teen Maze coming up at the Catoosa Colonnade  Oct. 6-9 .   The learning experience is produced as a cooperative effort of several agencies through the Catoosa Prevention Initiative serving sophomores of Catoosa, Walker and Dade counties.   “The event allows participants to examine the ... (click for more)

Woman Stabbed Multiple Times On Cleveland Avenue Early Thursday Morning

A woman was stabbed multiple times early Thursday morning. At approximately 3 a.m., Chattanooga Police responded to 2104 Cleveland Ave. for a stabbing. Officers located a black female in the roadway suffering from multiple stab wounds. The victim was transported to a local hospital by HCEMS for her injuries and is in stable condition. Investigators have not been able to ... (click for more)

City Council Taking Applications From Those Interested In Serving On City IDB

The City Council is taking applications from those interested in serving on the city industrial Development Board (IDB).   There are four vacancies on the board that has been in the news for its controversial approval and re-approval of $9 million in Tax Increment Financing (TIF) for developers of Aetna Mountain. Resumes are due by Sept. 29.   ... (click for more)

Walking Among Memories, The USS LST-325

I have walked among the head stones at Flanders Fields and have seen the entrenchment of soldiers with only bayonet tips sticking out of the earth. Later I traveled to Normandy where I stood on the sand and made scuff marks with my shoes on Omaha Beach and climbed the hill to the magnificent American Cemetery there. I again walked among the many, many tomb stones so neatly and ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: My Aunt Martha

During my first year at Ole Miss, I was so distracted by the stunning coeds on campus that I paid too much attention to the wrong kind of figures. I ended up flubbing a math class, which at the time was most serious and potentially deadly for an American boy. It meant I didn't have enough credit hours to avoid the draft and in almost no time I got a red, gut-retching postcard that ... (click for more)