Cleveland State Hosts Holocaust Survivor Ester Bauer Back On Campus Nov. 19

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Cleveland State Community College will once again be hosting Holocaust survivor Esther Bauer to campus on Tuesday, Nov. 19, at 6:30 p.m. in the George R. Johnson Cultural Heritage Center.  

Ms. Bauer was born in Hamburg, Germany in 1924. Her father, Dr. Alberto Jonas was the principal of the Jewish Girls School, and her mother Dr. Marie Anna Jonas was a medical doctor. On July 19, 1942, Esther Bauer, her mother, and her father were deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto in Czechoslovakia, where from one minute to the next they were prisoners. Her father died six weeks later of meningitis. After two years there, she married because her then friend, not yet husband, got the order to be sent with many others to the city of Dresden to build up a new ghetto. That was, of course, a lie. He and the other men wound up in Auschwitz. After the men left, their spouses were told they could go voluntarily after their husbands. Esther went and they all landed in Auschwitz where her husband was murdered. On Oct. 10, 1944 Esther’s mother was herself deported to Auschwitz and was murdered there. Esther survived. Esther was exuberant upon being liberated, and decided to “live each day, have fun and be a human being.” 

Dr. Tommy Wright, vice president for Finance and Administration, who introduced Ms. Bauer at her previous speaking engagement at CSCC, said, “Ms. Esther is a phenomenal person, brilliant historian, and candid orator that will make you laugh and cry as she shares her vivid story of the Holocaust.”    

The Esther Bauer speaking engagement is part of the 2013-2014 Program Series sponsored by the Office of Special Programs and Community Relations. All events are free to the public. Registration is recommended. 

To register or for more information on the Esther Bauer event, visit the website at mycs.cc/amazing. You can also call 423 473-2341 or email events@clevelandstatecc.edu



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