Books Presented to Public Library on Behalf of Historians of the Civil War Western Theater

Saturday, October 5, 2013
Left to Right: Sam Elliott, Mary Helms, Kit Rushing, Bucky Hughes, David Hughes, Frank Hughes
Left to Right: Sam Elliott, Mary Helms, Kit Rushing, Bucky Hughes, David Hughes, Frank Hughes

On October 4, local historians Sam Elliott and Dr. Kit Rushing presented several books to the Chattanooga Public Library on behalf of the Historians of the Civil War Western Theater, an organization of historians published on the subject of the Civil War’s Western Theater which meets once a year to provide a forum for the informal sharing of information, ideas, and concerns relating to that aspect of the study of the Civil War.  

The late Dr. Nat Hughes was a founding member of the organization, and its members decided to honor his memory with a gift to the library. 

Joining Mr. Elliott and Dr. Rushing were Dr. Hughes’ wife, Bucky, and two of their three sons, David and Frank.  The books were contributed by members of the organization, and included Sir Henry Morton Stanley: Confederate, the one book of the many written by Dr. Hughes that the library did not have in its collection. 

The Historians of the Civil War Western Theater meet in Chattanooga every other year, and are scheduled to return here in May, 2014.  

Photo of the donated books
Photo of the donated books

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