Lee University To Hold Annual Missions Week

Friday, November 1, 2013

The students, staff, and faculty of Lee University are preparing for the 2013 Dee Lavender Missions Week to be held Nov. 11-15. Throughout the week, the campus will be focused on “Build a City,” a People for Care and Learning project in Andong, Cambodia. 

“We get excited about communicating missions to our students,” said Deborah Page, campus ministry secretary. “It is worth all the time and effort when we see students connect with these representatives who do more than talk about missions, but live it on a day-to-day basis.”

Since 1991, Missions Week has been carried out in honor of Lee University student, Dee Lavender, who died on a summer mission trip to Panama just before her 21st birthday. Missions Week projects have been in place for 20 years, and a week devoted to missions has been part of Lee programming since the ‘40s.

During the week, chapel services and guest lecturers will provide students with information about Cambodia and other mission opportunities. Nearly 50 missionaries will be on campus during the week ready to share with students about the life of a missionary. In addition, missionaries will have exhibits in the Paul Conn Student Union. 

Lee will sell Missions Week T-shirts with all profits and other donations going directly to “Build a City.” The shirts will be available in the Conn Center for a $15 donation.

Funds raised from Missions Week 2013 will go towards building an entire city in Andong, Cambodia. In the Build a City initiative, PCL aims to build 1,500 homes, provide a way for the families to own their land and house, provide reliable infrastructures, and create an environment that fosters education, economic development, job training and health improvements. 

For more information about Missions Week or to make a donation visit http://www.leeuniversity.edu/missions-week/ or contact Campus Ministries at 614-8420.
 
 
PHOTO: Students and staff get ready for Missions Week 2013 (l to r) Brendan Cothran, Kelli Colwell, Kristi Vanoy, Michelle Bostic, Joyce Lane, Fijoy Johnson and Leah Meads.

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