Ooltewah Nursery & Landscape Company To Host Special Guest Speaker For Community Workshop

Monday, November 11, 2013

Ooltewah Nursery & Landscape Company, Inc. will offer a free workshop to the Chattanooga region, “Proper Pruning 101,” and will host Jonathan D. Nessle as special guest speaker. Proper pruning is a critical maintenance procedure for many trees & shrubs. 

“We often see customers who are confused about pruning, especially when to prune,” said Greg Miller, general manager. “Especially for flowering trees and shrubs, correct timing is crucial. People sometimes prune at the wrong time, and then later wonder why they don’t see the blooms they expected.” 

The workshop will focus on the proper techniques of pruning trees and shrubs teaching attendees the basics of how, when, why, and what to cut. The workshop will be Thursday, Nov. 14, at 3:30 p.m.

The workshop will be lead by Mr. Jonathan Nessle, A.S.L.D., who is a certified arborist by the International Society of Arboriculture with over 25 years of experience. Mr. Nessle is a board member of both the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council and the Chattanooga Urban Forestry Tree Commission. Also known as, “The Ornamentor,” Mr. Nessle is a popular public speaker and radio guest. 

“We are honored to host him because he has so much knowledge to share, and he is really skilled at training homeowners so they can have the confidence do it themselves. He is just so funny and easy to understand, we know everyone will really enjoy this workshop.” said Mr. Miller.

A family-owned business, Ooltewah Nursery & Landscape Company, Inc. was established in 1989 by life-long area residents, Wendell and Gina Whitener. ONLC has continued to serve the Chattanooga and North Georgia community by offering educational and informational learning opportunities for adults and children alike. 

For more information on this or other workshops for adults or children, contact sales@ooltewahnursery.com or call 423 238-9775.


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