World War II Medal Of Honor Recipient Charles Coolidge, Sr. Joins Signal Mountain Post Office In Medal Of Honor Stamp Ceremony

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

There will be a special dedication ceremony for the World War II Medal of Honor Forever stamps on Wednesday, at 12 p.m., at Signal Crest United Methodist Church, 1005 Ridgeway Ave., Chattanooga, Tn. 37377.

Among those attending will be World War II Medal of Honor recipient Charles H. Coolidge, Sr., USPS Tennessee District Manager David Dillman, Executive Director of the Chattanooga National Medal of Honor Museum of Military History Jim Wade, and State Senator Bo Watson.

More than 16 million Americans served in the armed forces during World War II. 464 were singled out to receive the Medal of Honor. Of that, nearly half died as a result of their heroic actions to receive the honor posthumously. Only nine are alive today. The Postal Service is issuing the stamps depicting the Medals of Honor and including photographs of the living recipients on the stamp sheet as an appropriate way to recognize the living while still paying respect to all 464 recipients whose names are included in the Medal of Honor World War II Forever stamp prestige folio.

Pictured (clockwise from top left) are Charles H. Coolidge of Chattanooga; Francis S. Currey of Selkirk, N.Y.; Walter D. Ehlers of Buena Park, Ca.; John D. Hawk of Bremerton, Wa.; Daniel K. Inouye of Honolulu, HI; Robert D. Maxwell of Bend, Or.; Vernon McGarity of Memphis; Nicholas Oresko of Creskill, N.J.; Wilburn K. Ross of Dupont, Wa.; and George T. Sakato of Denver, all of whom served with the U.S. Army. Arthur J. Jackson of Boise, Id.; and Hershel W. Williams of Ona, W.V.; served with the U.S. Marine Corps.

Senator Daniel K. Inouye and Vernon McGarity died before the stamps could be issued, as did Nicholas Oresko, who died after the stamps were printed. Their photographs are still included, as they remain among the last representatives of a remarkable group whose courage and devotion we honor with this issuance.

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