4 Online Georgia Hunter Education Courses Now Available

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division offers ways to make that happen: an eight-hour online or CD course followed by a two-hour review or the 10-hour traditional classroom course.

“Because of the importance of the information learned in a hunter education course, our agency has made efforts to meet the needs of many users,” said Walter Lane, hunter development program manager with the Wildlife Resources Division.  “The online courses offer more scheduling flexibility as they can be done at any time of day.  And for those who prefer a traditional method, the classroom courses provide a face-to-face opportunity with instructors.”

The classroom course is free of charge.  The four available online courses each require a fee (from $9.95 - $24.95) but all are “pass or don’t pay” courses.  Fees for these courses are charged by and collected by the independent course developer.  If the online course vendor fees are an obstacle, students can obtain a free CD-ROM by contacting their local DNR law enforcement office.

Completion of a hunter education course is required for any person born on or after Jan. 1, 1961, who:

·         purchases a season hunting license in Georgia.

·         is at least 12 years old and hunts without adult supervision.

·         hunts big game (deer, turkey, bear) on a wildlife management area.

The only exceptions include any person who:

 ·         purchases a short-term hunting license, such as the Apprentice License or the 3-day Hunting and Fishing Combo License (as opposed to a season license).

·         is hunting on his or her own land, or that of his or her parents or legal guardians.

For more information, go to www.gohuntgeorgia.com/hunting/education or call 770 761-3010. 



New State Record Blue Catfish Beats Previous By More Than 12 Pounds

A day of fishing is good. A day you catch a new state record – and beat the old one by more than 12 pounds – is great! Richard Barrett is the new state record holder for the blue catfish. His catch, weighing 93 lb, 0 oz, beat the previous 2010 record of 80 pounds, 4 ounces, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division.   Mr. ... (click for more)

Master Gardeners Of Hamilton County Offer Free Gardening Classes

The Master Gardeners of Hamilton County (MGHC), in association with the University of Tennessee Extension, extend their outreach with a series of Third Saturday Free Gardening Classes.  On Oct. 21, from 10 a.m.-noon, master gardener Bertha Livingston leads “Children in the Garden,” a workshop for adult/child partners.  MGHC classes take place at the UT Extension, ... (click for more)

Janice Raper, 69, Killed In Accident On Lee Highway

Janice Raper, 69, was killed Sunday evening in a car accident on Lee Highway. Chattanooga Police responded at 7:54 p.m. to a traffic crash at 6800 Lee Highway. A Toyota Sienna, driven by Ms. Raper was traveling northbound, attempting to make a left turn onto Hickory Valley Road.  A Dodge Challenger, driven by Charise Nash, 26, was traveling southbound on Lee Highway, ... (click for more)

Home On Standifer Gap Road Damaged By Fire Monday Morning

Chattanooga firefighters responded to a house fire at 6731 Standifer Gap Road a round  9:30  a.m. on Monday . Battalion Chief Brandon Schroyer said the first arriving firefighters with Quint 8 encountered dark smoke coming from the basement. The firefighters attacked the fire quickly, using hand-held hoselines to extinguish the fire within a few minutes.  ... (click for more)

October Is Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Myth And Fact Check

My husband and I recently had the privilege of participating in the American Cancer Society’s Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk in Chattanooga. I listened as my husband told the audience about how his mother was diagnosed with breast cancer when he was nine and how she died from the disease when he was fourteen. As a child, my husband didn’t understand what breast cancer ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Evil This Way Comes

There is a line in Act IV of William Shakespeare's Macbeth, as some of the 20,000 students at Middle Tennessee State are taught, that reads: "By the pricking of my thumbs / Something wicked this way comes." The professors explain that in the 16 th century the “pricking of thumbs” meant an intuition of evil about to happen and every student at MTSU knows several white supremacy ... (click for more)