Veterans Day Program at Public Library is November 11

Saturday, November 2, 2013

The Chattanooga Area Historical Association and the Local History and Genealogy Department of The Public Library invite you to this special Veteran’s Day program.

The program will begin with a brief re-enactment of two recipients of the Medal of Honor from the Chickamauga & Chattanooga Campaigns in September & November 1863. It will include a bugle call by the Army MOH recipient, Musician William J. Carson; 15th US Infantry Regiment who is portrayed by re-enactor Patrick Parris of Trenton , Ga. The Medal of Honor will be awarded by Secretary of War, William Stanton, who will be portrayed by local historian and author, E. Raymond Evans.

The Medal will also be awarded to Mary E. Walker, who was a "Contract Assistant Surgeon" for the Army of the Cumberland and the only women to ever receive the Medal of Honor. Mary will be portrayed by Carol Laing, Secretary for the National Medal of Honor Museum of Military History.

The main part of the program will be a presentation on Chattanooga's National Medal of Honor Museum of Military History and the Military Heritage of Chattanooga in the Civil War. Those making the presentation will be Jim Wade- Executive Director and George Davenport - Board of Trustee member for the museum. 

Copies of the Museum's new book, "Paths of Valor," will be available covering the Medal of Honor in the Civil War and the Chattanooga area. If you would like more information about this event, please contact Scott Seagle at 423/364-3169 or email at

Chester Martin Remembers Being Chased By Spooks On Halloween

Halloween was always a cool time of year for the kids of my day. It was celebrated at both home and school, sometimes it could get a little bit out-of-hand, but   was mainly a harmless fall festival. It has changed but little through the years. At school we had our Halloween parties, just like today - with about the same   foods and trappings as today - the apple-bobbing, ... (click for more)

Tri-state (TN-GA-AL) Rail Stops - Orme Branch Railroad, Chattanooga Traction Company

ORME BRANCH RAILROAD, 1904   The Orme Branch Railroad (OB) was built by the Campbell Coke and Coal Company in 1904 as the Doran’s Cove Branch Railroad (DCB), primarily to send its coal and coke from its mines at Orme, opened in 1902, to market along a more efficient route than the mountain roads it had been using.   The Battle Creek Coal and Coke Company bought ... (click for more)

Man Being Pursued By Catoosa County Deputies Is Killed After Crash At Ringgold Road Overpass

A man who was being pursued by Catoosa County deputies was killed late Monday night when he crashed his vehicle at the Ringgold Road overpass. The interstate was shut down for an extended period after the accident at 11:20 p.m. The truck driven by the man careened off the overpass and landed on the northbound lanes of I-75. The truck hit the center wall and caught fire. ... (click for more)

Gang Member, 22, Shot In The Arm On Wilcox Boulevard Early Tuesday Morning

A 22-year-old man was shot in the arm in the 1800 block of Wilcox Boulevard early Tuesday morning. Just after midnight, Chattanooga Police responded to a report of shots fired. Upon arrival, police located Jakobi Buthelezi Johnson suffering from a very minor, single gunshot wound. Hamilton County EMS transported the victim to a local hospital for treatment. The victim ... (click for more)

October Is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Picture a sold-out baseball game at Wrigley Field or Nationals Park packed with 40,000 fans. That image represents roughly the same number of women and men who die from breast cancer each year.  In Tennessee alone, an estimated 900 women will die from the disease in 2016. It is a sad statistic, but there is some good news: thanks to early detection and improved treatments, ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: What Southerners Sing

Barry Norris plays the organ at Birmingham’s East Lake United Methodist Church and two days ago the church hosted what we used to call “A Singing on the Grounds.” Today it is called a “Hymnfest” and, believe it or not, it is has to be just as fun today as it was 100 years ago when our forefathers tied their horse and wagon to a tree. It just so happens I know a little bit about ... (click for more)