Museum Center at Five Points Seeks Participants in History Day Competition

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

National History Day’s preliminary district competition for Southeast Tennessee will be held at the Museum Center at 5ive Points on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014. Educators who are interested in having students in grades 6-12 participate are asked to contact Curator of Education Joy Neenstra at

History Day is a year-long curriculum enhancement program that engages students in the process of discovering and interpreting historical topics. Winners at the district level proceed to a state competition in April and, from there, to a national competition in June.

“Participants in History Day will discover just how exciting history can be,” said Neenstra. “The competition fosters a deeper appreciation of the subject matter in a fun and engaging format.”

"It is a privilege to once again host the district competition for History Day,” said Executive Director Hassan Najjar. “The Museum Center is committed to being a resource for schools by offering a variety of learning opportunities, such as this.”

The Museum Center at 5ive Points tells the story of the Ocoee region through compelling exhibitions and dynamic educational programming that promotes history, culture, and preservation. The Museum Store features arts, crafts, and books from select artists, craftsman, and authors from within a 200-mile radius.

Hours are Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Saturday 10 a.m.-3 p.m. The museum is closed Sunday, Monday, and on select holidays. Admission is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors and students, and free for children under 5. Members of the Museum receive free admission. Group rates are available and the Museum’s facilities can be rented year-round for weddings and special events.

For further information call 423-339-5745, or visit

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