Prime Time To Plan, Enroll In USDA Conservation Programs

Friday, December 06, 2013

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has received notification from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) that a period is underway for agricultural and non-industrial private forestland program to apply for technical and financial assistance. The assistance is available through two USDA conservation programs.

With crop harvesting winding down and haying operations at a lull, now is a good time to plan future improvements to farm operations and wildlife habitat. Many land practices can improve farm efficiency, profitability, and wildlife habitat while benefiting water quality, reducing soil erosion, and improving soil health and forestlands.

The USDA and Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), has set Friday, Dec. 20, 2013 as the cutoff date for their first fiscal year evaluation and funding consideration for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) and Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP).   Funding is limited, and only projects that are “ready to implement” will be ranked for funding consideration.

The TWRA has four private lands biologists that work out of NRCS offices and will develop wildlife habitat plans for landowners and guide them through the USDA application process.  Once plans are accepted in programs, the biologists will also provide advice to help the participants successfully implement their habitat practices.  Their assistance is also available to landowners that do not desire to participate in USDA programs.

Contact information for the TWRA biologists, USDA offices, and information on USDA programs can be found at www.twraprivatelands.org , by contacting their local USDA Service Center, or by calling the TWRA Wildlife and Forestry Division at 615 781-6610.


Crabtree Farms Offers Fall Gardening Workshop

In response to a growing interest in fall backyard gardening, local non-profit, Crabtree Farms is offering educational opportunities and affordable, healthy plant starts to help Chattanoogans grow their own food this fall.   “While most people are excited to plant their gardens in spring or summer, there is a growing number of people who realize that they can enjoy ... (click for more)

Star Party At Cloudland Canyon Will Be Aug. 23

The Summer Constellations will be the topic of the upcoming Star Party at Cloudland Canyon State Park on Saturday, Aug. 23 .  Sponsored by the staff and friends of Cloudland Canyon State Park, the program will be presented by members of the Barnard Astronomical Society and will be held at the tennis courts. The program begins at 8 p.m. and participants will learn ... (click for more)

EPB Says It Did Not Overbill The City; Says City Got $685,877 Break

EPB officials said Tuesday that an exhaustive audit of its street light contract with the city showed that it did not overbill the city. Instead, it said it found that the city was underbilled $685,877. EPB said it only goes back one year on errors so the amount owed by the city would be $178,314. Officials said that would be discussed with the city. Stan Sewell, the city's ... (click for more)

Citizens To Comment Next Tuesday On Sound Control Ordinance That Allows Higher Sound Around Downtown Clubs

Citizens will be allowed to comment next Tuesday on a new Sound Control Ordinance that allows higher sound from nightclubs in a downtown Controlled Sound Boundary. Track 29 behind the Chattanooga Choo Choo, that has drawn the wrath of some nearby Southside residents, is within the boundary, which goes from Fourth Street to Main Street. The hearing before the City Council ... (click for more)

The Truth- From Weston’s Sister

I try not to read the negative articles and opinions about my older brother. Growing up around politics, I learned a long time ago that thick skin is not only necessary, it’s paramount. But this time, the lies and the rumors and the inaccurate information has gone too far. It’s too ridiculous for me to ignore. So let’s clear a few things up: Weston and I do not “come ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Oscar Brock’s True Passion

I don’t pay much attention to the Hamilton County School Board. Once the moon and the stars aligned behind Superintendent Rick Smith, you hear very little, if anything, from the nine-member council that oversees an annual budget of almost $400 million and employs 4,480 people. So chew this for a minute: approximately 2,000 of those people are not teachers. Yes, there are 78 principals ... (click for more)