Introduction To Sandhill Cranes Is Topic For TWRA's February Noontime Program

Friday, February 1, 2013

"Cranes 101: A Basic Introduction to Cranes" is the February topic for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s Nature at Noontime program. The program will be held from noon-1 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 7.

Melinda Welton will be the program presenter. She is a research associate with Gulf Coast Bird Observatory and an ornithological consultant under the name of Birdworks Consulting. She has been actively involved in several TWRA projects concerning songbirds and for the last two years, she has also served as co-chairwoman of the Tennessee Sandhill Crane Festival.

Standing over four feet tall with a wingspan of more than six feet, the sandhill crane is one of the largest birds found in Tennessee and the most abundant crane in the world. Over the last 60 years, the sandhill has made a comeback after being nearly wiped out in the 1800s due to breeding habitat loss and over hunting. Virtually every individual in the smaller eastern population of sandhill cranes will pass over or spend the winter at the confluence of the Tennessee and Hiwassee rivers in southeastern Tennessee. Thousands of these birds can be viewed each winter at TWRA’s Hiwassee Refuge.

Hosted by the Information and Education Division, Nature at Noontime is held the first Thursday of each month. TWRA Nature at Noontime presentations are about natural resource related topics and last about 30-45 minutes, allowing time for discussion during the allotted lunch hour. 

Contact Don King 615 781-6502 or by e-mail: don.king@tn.gov for more information.


Appalachian Trail Produces Deer Poacher And Lost Dog

TWRA wildlife officers working along the Appalachian Trail in the Cherokee National Forest near Butler charged a hunter with violations related to illegal deer hunting, then rescued a lost family pet in the same area.  Carter County Wildlife Officer Dennis Ward has documented illegal ATV tracks on Iron Mountain for several years, and while scouting out the area this year, ... (click for more)

Low Water Levels Increase Boating Hazard

With the statewide duck season set to open, winter angling opportunities and those recreational boaters withstanding colder temperatures to continue enjoying their sport, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) reminds boaters of  increased hazards in areas with low water levels. Above average temperatures and below average rainfall throughout the year has affected water ... (click for more)

Curtis Coleman Sentenced To 144 Months For Dealing Heroin

Curtis Allen Coleman, 41, of Dayton, Ohio, was sentenced to serve 144 months in prison by Federal Judge Travis R. McDonough for heroin distribution in Chattanooga. Coleman pleaded guilty in August to a federal indictment charging him with, among other things, conspiracy to distribute heroin.  According to information on file with the United States District ... (click for more)

Red Cross Continues Tornado Relief In Southeast Tennessee

After tornadoes and strong straight-line winds moved through Southeast Tennessee on Tuesday evening, Red Cross mobilized more than 70 volunteers, provided shelter for displaced residents, and is working to ensure that emergency needs are being met for everyone who was affected.   “We are working very closely with our local Emergency Management Agencies and community partners ... (click for more)

Tennessee River Gorge Trust Trail Warriors Make You Want To Take A Hike

Trail warriors of the Tennessee River Gorge Trust make you want to take a hike.  The Tennessee River Gorge Trust staff and volunteers make a huge difference in the Chattanooga community and have been making the outdoor areas around the River Gorge clean and protected for more than 30 years.  They deserve to be recognized and praised for all of the hard work they have ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: The Bible In Gatlinburg

The day after fire rained and reigned in Gatlinburg, Isaac McCord, 24 and from Tullahoma, was picking up debris at the popular Dollywood attraction. The theme park had minimal damage compared to the hundreds of structure either lost or severely damaged in Sevier County. He picked up a piece of paper that was in a puddle of water, beneath a bench. “It was one of the most surreal ... (click for more)