Common Core Leadership Council Begins Second Year Of Work

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Following what was called the success of Tennessee’s first Common Core Leadership Council, the department of education on Wednesday announced a new group of principals, supervisors and superintendents who will give districts a voice in the statewide transition to the Common Core State Standards. The new Leadership Council will advise the department on the Common Core transition plan and directly lead and manage all aspects of the work, including a summer statewide training of more than 30,000 teachers.

“The success of our implementation of the Common Core State Standards will be directly related to our ability to engage a diverse group of Tennessee educators and stakeholders,” said Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman. “We’ve got one chance to get this right, and I’m grateful to our new Leadership Council for helping us make sure that we do.”

The 22 members of the Leadership Council come from all regions of the state, and will advise department officials on formal and informal assessments and professional development resources; shape the framework for all Common Core pilot programs; and become regional experts and leaders in the importance and concrete expectations of the standards. They also will inform training of more than 600 Core Coaches to provide statewide professional development for more than 30,000 teachers in grades K-12 math and literacy this summer.

Last year’s council successfully implemented the training of more than 10,000 educators on three to eight math standards, and also created the template for the state’s Common Core Leadership Course for principals and assistant principals. 

Lexington City Schools Superintendent Susie Bunch served on the first council, and will continue her work in 2013. She said the common thread between all council members is a profound belief in the Common Core State Standards and in the ability of Tennessee’s students and teachers to make a successful transition to them.

“Our council sessions yield rich discussions about teaching and learning and how both will shift as the state moves toward full implementation of the Common Core,” she said. “From these rich discussions, decisions leading to the next steps of this transition journey are made.”

 

2013-14 Common Core Leadership Council Members

Name

Position

District

CORE Region

Jerry Ayers

Director of Career and Technical Education

Greeneville City

First TN

Jared Bigham

Principal, Copper Basin High School

Polk County

Southeast

Jerry S. Boyd

Director of Schools

Putnam County

Upper Cumberland

Susie Bunch

Director of Schools

Lexington City

Southwest/

Memphis

Sharon Cooksey

Curriculum & Professional Learning Specialist

Franklin Special School District

Mid-Cumberland

Linda Kennard

Executive Director, Curriculum & Instruction/Pre-K-12 Literacy

Memphis City Schools

Southwest/

Memphis

Vicki Kirk

Director of Schools

Greene County

First TN

Scott Langford

Assistant Principal, White House Middle School

Sumner County

Mid-Cumberland

Meghan Little

Chief Academic Officer

KIPP Nashville Schools

Mid-Cumberland

Jared Myracle

Supervisor of Instruction

Gibson County

Northwest

Theresa Nixon

Science Supervisor

Knox County

East

Mike Novak

Principal, Liberty Elementary School

Bedford County

South Central

Jamie Parris

Director of Secondary Math & Science

Hamilton County

Southeast

Martin Ringstaff

Director of Schools

Cleveland City

Southeast

Clint Satterfield

Director of Schools

Trousdale County

Upper Cumberland

Millicent Smith

Executive Director, Curriculum, Instruction & Professional Development

Knox County

East

Jay Steele

Chief Academic Officer

Metro Nashville Public Schools

Mid-Cumberland

David Stephens

Chief of Staff

Shelby County

Southwest/

Memphis

David Timbs

Assistant Superintendent

Sullivan County

First TN

Pennye Thurmond

Principal, Ripley Elementary School

Lauderdale County

Southwest/

Memphis

Amanda Hill Vance

Special Education Supervisor

Monroe County

East

Vicki Violette

Director of Schools

Clinton City

East


For more information, contact Kelli Gauthier at 615 532-7817 or Kelli.Gauthier@tn.gov.

 


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