Rugby Season Begins With Lantern Tour-St. Patrick’s Feast

Wednesday, February 27, 2013 - by Amy Barnes
Lantern Tour
Lantern Tour

Historic Rugby will open its 2013 season on March 16, with two special events. The award winning program “Lantern Tour on Stage” tells the story of Rugby’s past through the words of colonists and residents through the years. The unique combination of live actors and historic photographs make for an interesting afternoon. You will be transported back in time to see and hear about Rugby’s past as told by characters like Robert Walton, who ran the colony for many years. You will hear stories of love, murder, and tales of life on the Plateau only 130 years ago. Added this year to the program are stories of more recent history, including tales of the Martin family, who were instrumental in bringing Rugby back to life after decades of decline.

Lantern Tour on Stage will be presented in the Rebecca Johnson Theatre on Saturday, March 16, at 4 p.m. The cost is $10 for adults and $5 for students. Included in your admission will be a special 20% discount card to be used that evening at the Harrow Road Café for one meal (wine and ales not included in discount). Just bring your ticket to the café for your special discount after the show. Reservations are recommended for the Lantern Tour. Call Historic Rugby at 423 628-2441 or e-mail for reservations at historicrugby@highland.net.

After the program, don’t miss a special St. Patrick’s Day Feast at the café. In addition to the usual menu items available that night, we will feature a special dinner of Irish favorites including corn beef and cabbage and flounder almandine. Reservations are not required, but will be accepted.

Historic Rugby, an award-winning membership organization, has worked since 1966 to preserve and interpret for the public the 1880 British village founded by author and statesman Thomas Hughes. Historic Rugby provides daily tours and other programming, lodging, and dining at the Harrow Road Café. Located on SR 52, Historic Rugby is the southern gateway to the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area. 


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