TDEC Announces 2013 Energy Camps For K-12 Teachers

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation’s Office of Energy Programs announced that applications are now available for the 2013 Energy Camps. The four-day educational sessions are free and provide K-12 teachers with the information and resources needed to teach the science of energy and energy conservation in the classroom, while helping students to become leaders in their schools and communities.

 

 

“These Energy Camps provide essential tools to teachers, giving them a better understanding of energy conservation,” said TDEC Commissioner Bob Martineau. “The knowledge they will receive at the camps will prepare them to educate the next generation on the importance of energy conservation, providing for a cleaner energy future and benefiting overall community growth.”

 

The 2013 Energy Camp offers activities presented by award-winning energy educators and professionals. Camp activities will address Tennessee science curriculum standards and will incorporate Common Core Standards for reading/language arts and mathematics. In addition, special breakout sessions will be conducted with grade-level clusters to ensure that all participating teachers leave the camps with ideas ready for their classrooms. Each camp will also include a one-day trip to energy-related sites, such as TVA’s Cumberland Fossil and Watts Bar Nuclear Power plants.

 

K-12 teachers are invited to apply for one of the following three camps during the summer of 2013: 

 

June 11-14 at Montgomery Bell State Park Inn in Burns, Tenn. 

June 18-21 at Pickwick Landing State Park Inn in Pickwick Dam, Tenn.      

July 9-12 at Fall Creek Falls State Park Inn in Pikeville, Tenn. 

 

The Energy Camps address required curriculum standards and help teachers integrate energy activities into not only science, but math, language arts, social studies and visual and performing arts lessons. They will focus on creating real-world situations in the classroom and collecting and analyzing data, in order to evaluate and improve the school’s energy usage.

 

“Now is the time for Tennessee’s students to begin thinking about energy conservation and the important role it plays in reducing energy demand and promoting a cleaner environment,” said Office of Energy Programs Director Molly Cripps. “The Energy Camps provide great resources for teachers and their students, including examples for reducing energy consumption at home and at school.” 

 

Participating teachers will receive complimentary lodging, meals and camp materials, in addition to a $400 “mini” grant to help fund each school’s energy education program. Early registration is suggested as space is limited and the camps will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Educators in all subjects and grade levels may attend and schools may send up to two teachers. Teachers who attended energy camps in 2012 are eligible but must also submit a National Energy Education Development (NEED) project, a scrapbook of energy education activities completed during the school year.

 

For more information, contact Chyrall Dawson at chyrall.dawson@tn.gov or call the Energy Hotline at 800/342-1340. The application deadline is April 12.

 


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