Chattanooga State Honored With Prestigious Bellwether Award

Thursday, February 7, 2013
Shown, from left to right, are Tim McGhee, Chattanooga State dean, engineering technology; Dr. Jim Catanzaro, Chattanooga State president, and Dr. George Graham, Chattanooga State head, chemical engineering technology and director, Wacker Institute.
Shown, from left to right, are Tim McGhee, Chattanooga State dean, engineering technology; Dr. Jim Catanzaro, Chattanooga State president, and Dr. George Graham, Chattanooga State head, chemical engineering technology and director, Wacker Institute.

Chattanooga State Community College received the celebrated Bellwether award at the 2013 Community College Futures Assembly in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. The award is bestowed upon a community college with leading edge programs in community college practices worthy of replication. Since its inception 19 years ago, only 55 winning projects have been selected from among thousands of applicants.

Chattanooga State won in the Workforce Development category for a project called “The Wacker Institute: Diplomas with Job Offers!” The Workforce Development category recognizes programs that create public and/or private strategic alliances and partnerships that promote community and economic development. Chattanooga State formed a partnership with Wacker Polysilicon, North America to establish the Wacker Institute, which opened February, 2012.

According to Dr. George Graham, head of the chemical engineering department at Chattanooga State and director of the Wacker Institute, “this is an affirmation of the tremendous efforts made by our faculty and staff to provide a world-class educational experience while exceeding the expectations of our partner’s (Wacker) needs – what an honor to be recognized as the best of best among other community colleges around the country.”

The Engineering Technology Wacker Institute stands ready to offer programs of study that will produce the best educated and trained technicians in the chemical manufacturing industry through a unique and rigorous educational collaborative. Graduates receive an associate of applied science degree (A.A.S.) in Engineering Technology or an embedded certificate in other technical areas of emphasis. The Institute’s key areas of education focus on preparing students to become process technicians (chemical operators), chemical laboratory technicians, electronics and instrumentation systems technicians, and mechanical systems technicians.

The innovative collaboration provides students an exciting blend of theory and hands-on experiences, which includes training in a one-of-kind chemical pilot plant located within the 25,000 square foot Institute.  Graduates of the Chemical Engineering Technology program of study leave with their diploma in one hand and a job offer from Wacker in the other.

“We congratulate Chattanooga State on winning the prestigious Bellwether Award. The program they developed at the Wacker Institute is important to our future. The applied learning characteristic of programs developed by Chattanooga State are exactly what industry needs to prepare the workforce for today and the future. Chattanooga State’s approach of learning the competencies and educational needs of industry and developing a workforce to meet that gap hits the mark every time. The CRMA applauds these events and considers them essential to the economic development of Tennessee. We are proud to be their partner,” said Tim Spires, CEO and president, Chattanooga Regional Manufacturer’s Association.

For more information about chemical engineering technology or other programs in engineering technology at Chattanooga State, visit chattanoogastate.edu/engineering-technology/ or call 423 697-4434.

 

 


Cleveland State And Tennessee Wesleyan Sign Dual Admission Agreement

Dr. Harley Knowles, President of Tennessee Wesleyan College, and Dr. Bill Seymour, President of Cleveland State Community College, signed a Dual Admission agreement between the two colleges on Wednesday, Jan. 28. This agreement allows students to enroll concurrently at Cleveland State and Tennessee Wesleyan, providing students the opportunity to complete an Associate’s degree at ... (click for more)

Covenant College Theatre Department Presents Heart-rending, True And Inspiring Story Edith Stein

Covenant College begins its spring season with the provocative and poignant play Edith Stein . The story is based on the life of Jewish intellectual Edith Stein, following her from becoming a Carmelite nun all the way to her martyrdom at Auschwitz. Brilliantly written by Arthur Giron, the show deals with the intense struggles of genocide and willing sacrifice as displayed in Stein’s ... (click for more)

Chance Loftis Set To Be Freed From Jail After Jury Finds Him Guilty Of Only Misdemeanor Charge

Chance Loftis is set to be freed from jail on Monday after a Criminal Court jury on Friday afternoon found him guilty of only a minor charge. Instead of murder in the death of 46-year-old Donald Rogers, the jury in the courtroom of Judge Don Poole found him guilty of the lesser charge of reckless endangerment. He was found not guilty of aggravated animal cruelty in the beating ... (click for more)

1 Dies In House Fire In Rhea County

Rhea County Fire Department officials said one person died in an early-morning house fire on Saturday. The call came at about 6:30 a.m. The brick residence is on Fisher Road. S tate arson investigators were on their way. (click for more)

It's Time To Insure Tennessee - And Response

Tennessee has a problem.  What is the value of saving the lives of 1,000 Tennesseans each year? That is exactly what can be expected if 176,000 Tennesseans gain health insurance through Insure Tennessee. A New England Journal of Medicine study showed that expansion of Medicaid was associated with a 6% reduction in yearly mortality for people in the 34-65 age group. Statistically, ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: What About The Ashes?

I attended my fifth funeral in the month of January the other day and, while I wish a lot of my friends would hang around a little longer, I was amused by the conversation in the pew before the service began. The question was “ … then what do you do with the ashes?” More and more people are being cremated and asking their loved ones to scatter their ashes -- more properly called ... (click for more)