Tennessee Broadband Adoption Rate Is Increasing

Friday, March 8, 2013

New data released by Connected Tennessee shows that broadband adoption in Tennessee is increasing, with 68% of residents now subscribing to broadband service, up from 58% in 2010. Still, nearly 1.6 million adults in Tennessee are without home broadband connections, including approximately 776,000 who do not use the Internet at all. 

The data is available via an interactive widget on the Connected Tennessee website.

Among the key findings of the residential survey are:

  • More than 366,000 Tennessee adults say they don’t subscribe to broadband because the cost of getting connected is too expensive, and an additional 251,000 say they don’t have the digital literacy skills to do so.
  • Mobile broadband usage is skyrocketing in Tennessee – nearly one-half of Tennessee adults go online using their cell phones. This includes over 369,000 Tennessee adults who rely on their cell phones instead of subscribing to home broadband service.
  • Over one-quarter of rural adults in Tennessee are without a computer at home.
  • An estimated 350,000 Tennessee children do not have broadband service at home, limiting their ability to do homework or conduct research online.
  • More than 1.4 million Tennesseans report using the Internet at their jobs; while nearly one in six employed adults work at home instead of commuting.
  • While desktop computer ownership declined slightly, the number of tablet computer owners has more than doubled since 2011.

This survey is conducted in support of Connected Tennessee’s efforts to close Tennessee’s digital divide and explores the barriers to high-speed Internet adoption, rates of broadband adoption among various demographics, and the types of activities broadband subscribers conduct online, among other findings.

“The double-digit gains we’ve seen in Tennessee broadband adoption are an inspiring step in the right direction,” said Connected Tennessee Executive Director Corey Johns. “More and more Tennesseans are recognizing the job and quality of life opportunities made possible through high-speed Internet – both at home and on the go. Grades and homework are being submitted online, business transactions are taking place wirelessly, and as broadband technology continues to transform the way we live, learn, work, and play, this exciting new research affirms and underscores the importance of efforts to increase broadband access, adoption and use across Tennessee.” 

To address this digital divide, Connected Tennessee offers the Every Community Online program providing access to free digital literacy training and low-cost computers and Internet access, as well as the Computers 4 Kids program which has donated over 4,000 computers to the 76 Boys & Girls Clubs in Tennessee and to youth aging out of the Tennessee Department of Children’s Services program.

Connected Tennessee’s 2012 residential survey was conducted in late 2012 and includes responses from 1,202 residents. The survey was conducted as part of the State Broadband Initiative (SBI) grant program, funded by the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Telecommunications and Information Administration, and by the American Recovery and Reinvestment of 2009.

Autumn Witt Boyd Joins Nextlaw Global Referral Network

The Law Office of Autumn Witt Boyd announced on Wednesday, it has joined Nextlaw Global Referral Network, enabling it to connect its clients to high quality lawyers around the world. Nextlaw Global Referral Network is the largest legal referral network in the world, with 283 member firms, 18,600 lawyers covering 160 countries. Ms. Boyd said, “By joining Nextlaw Global Referral ... (click for more)

Nicholson Celebrates 50 Years At Mohawk

Most people can’t imagine working at the same company for 50 years, but Dalton native Lennie Nicholson can’t imagine anything else.    She began working at Aladdin Mills in 1966 when she was still in high school as part of a Vocational Occupational Training program and was hired on full-time after graduation as a traffic controller, managing truck shipments and making ... (click for more)

2 Witnesses To A Murder Refuse To Testify At Jury Trial

Two men who prosecutors say witnessed a murder in Hixson on Jan. 31, 2014, on Wednesday refused to tell their story to a jury. Criminal Court Judge Barry Steelman ordered Andrew Biro and Jacob Tyler "T.Y." Keel to answer questions from prosecutor Lance Pope, but they both refused. Biro had said during testimony in General Sessions Court that Christopher Levi Parker threatened ... (click for more)

PETA And Humane Educational Society Offer Reward For Torture-Killing Of Dog After Envelope Mailed From Chattanooga

An envelope postmarked from Chattanooga and containing a photo of a dog strung between two trees arrived at PETA's office in Virginia Tuesday, along with the severed ear of a dog. PETA members are offering a reward of $5,000-and the Humane Educational Society of Chattanooga has added another $1,000-for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person(s) responsible ... (click for more)

Accountability Doesn't Have To Be A Bad Word

Am I making a difference? Isn’t that the basic question we all ask ourselves, and seek to demonstrate to others?  Ronald Reagan said:  “Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. But, the Marines don't have that problem.”   We would argue teachers do not have that problem either.    Educators make a huge difference ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: ‘The Right To Bear Arms’

As the worldwide debut of the much-anticipated “Hacksaw Ridge” is set for next weekend, it didn’t take long for the anti-gun fanatics to decry “a war movie.” Mel Gibson, the director of the film that focuses on a conscientious objector Desmond Doss who refused to bear a weapon but saved an estimated 75 lives, was asked about America’s gun problem as he toured to promote the film. ... (click for more)