Tom Griscom Speaks To Chattanooga Area Historical Association April 29

Monday, April 22, 2013

Tom Griscom will discuss his years in the Reagan White House at the Chattanooga Area Historical Association on Monday, April 29, 6 p.m. at the Chattanooga Downtown Library.  The event is free and open to the public.

Mr. Griscom is a native Chattanoogan who after graduating from UTC established himself as a reporter with the Chattanooga Free Press.  After several years, Mr. Griscom was enticed away to Washington DC where he served in Senator Howard Baker's office when the senator was the Senate Majority Leader.  When Senator Baker left to be President Ronald Reagan's chief of staff, he took Mr. Griscom with him to head up the Communication Center for the White House.   

After the White House, Mr. Griscom returned to Chattanooga for a short time but was offered an executive position  with Reynolds Corporation where he learned big time business in the private sector.  This knowledge he applied to the Chattanooga Times Free Press when he returned to be the paper's executive editor.  Mr. Griscom now has his own consulting firm. 

Here are more upcoming events for the Chattanooga Area Historical Association: 

Tuesday, May 14, 6 p.m. Hamilton County Courthouse, tour led by Linda Mines, county historian

Monday, May 20, 6 p.m. Downtown Library, Ron Tanner, nationally known writer and preservationist

Monday, June 24, 6 p.m. David Cook, writer and former GPS history teacher speaking about women's suffrage

Saturday, Sept. 21, 11 a.m. Coker Farm, Harold Coker will give tour of his antique cars

For additional information, call Marti Rutherford 595-4468.

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